Guest Blogger


Occasionally, The ConnCollegeLive Experience will invite guests to blog about their experiences as a Camel. You can find these guest posts below. Each guest post ends with a short description of the writer and their role on campus.


First person: Playing in the NCAA Division III tournament

December 4, 2014  |  Guest Blogger

Occasionally, The ConnCollegeLive Experience will invite guests to blog about their experiences as Camels. Today, Chelsea Preston '16 contributes to the guest blogger series. Chelsea was a member of the 2014 Connecticut College women's soccer team, which won the College's first NESCAC Championship and played in the NCAA Division III tournament. We asked Chelsea to capture, firsthand, what it was like to head into the national tournament.

Friday, Nov. 14, 2014

We boarded the bus at 1 p.m. after being sent off by a group of students and fans, including President Bergeron, at the entrance to the Athletic Center. After a three-hour trip, we arrived at Montclair State University to practice on the turf field where we'd play our game on Saturday and, hopefully, again on Sunday. We only had an hour to practice before the next team would need the turf, so we quickly went through our typical drills. The energy was high. We were playing music and were just happy to be there, in the national tournament. After practice, we headed back to the hotel, watched some film on Swarthmore — the team we would play the next day — and headed to bed.

Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014

In the morning, the team boarded the bus to go to teammate Leah Salituro’s house for breakfast. Her house is only 30 minutes from where we were playing, so we had a great team breakfast there. On away games, Coach Riker likes us to take a walk to clear our heads for the upcoming game, so we walked around the neighborhood before going back to the hotel. We had some downtime to catch up on homework, then it was time to leave for the game. We arrived at Montclair's athletic center and started to prepare for the game. We played our usual music to get us pumped up and we were ready to go. We were excited, but nervous to play a team we had never seen before. It was a new challenge we were ready to face.

Game: Conn College vs. Swarthmore

The game, the first round of the NCAA tournament, was exciting as we pulled ahead with a set-piece goal from my teammate Becca Raymond. Swarthmore came back and tied it with a goal. In the second half, we got another goal from Livi Block and, to finish it off with a minute left, Mitchy Medina scored to make the final 3-1. We were so excited to have made it through that game and to be able to play on Sunday. It seemed like a never-ending season.

Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014

We woke up, had team breakfast, and hung out at the hotel until we left for our game. Two games in two days is never easy, especially when you are playing teams you have never seen before. We gathered up all our energy in the locker room like we had the day before and were ready to play. This day was different because we weren’t as nervous as we had been on Saturday.

Game: Conn College vs. Montclair State

Montclair put up a fight, and so did we. It was a tough game and we made it through regulation time without a score. It seemed as though we were going to make it all the way to penalty kicks with 50 seconds left in overtime. Unfortunately, Montclair got a shot off that ended up in the back of the net. Our season was over.

The historic, long, exciting season we had worked so hard for was over, in mid-November. Not many teams can say that. We are so proud of our season, for being NESCAC championss and for having made it as far as we did. We went from the bottom of our league to No. 1 in one season and won our first NCAA tournament game. This season was certainly one for the books!

Chelsea Preston '16  is an art major and a forward on the 2014 women's soccer team.

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Tags:  |  The Experience, Athletics

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#ConnCollCarries: Bringing the #CarryThatWeight movement to campus

October 30, 2014  |  Guest Blogger

Occasionally, The ConnCollegeLive Experience will invite guests to blog about their experiences as a Camel. Today, Bettina Weiss '15 contributes to the guest blogger series.

On Oct. 29, Connecticut College students participated in a National Day of Action inspired by the art and activism of Emma Sulkowicz, a student at Columbia University. Sulkowicz has been carrying a 50-pound mattress wherever she goes on campus for her senior art thesis. The New York Times calls Sulkowicz’ project “an artwork of last resort.”

In 2012, Sulkowicz filed a complaint with Columbia after an alleged sexual assault. Her complaint led to a hearing before a panel that found the alleged perpetrator not responsible. This decision was upheld upon appeal. Sulkowicz brought her case to the police but decided not to follow through after the report. She began carrying her mattress around campus to protest the fact that her alledged attacker was allowed to remain enrolled at the university. 

In response to Sulkowicz’ project, the coalition “Carrying the Weight Together” was formed by students and activists who are working to support survivors of sexual and domestic violence. It is made up of members from No Red Tape, Carrying the Weight Together at Columbia University, Hollaback! and Rhize.

When students at Connecticut College heard about the National Day of Action to support Sulkowicz, we sprung into action. Sal Bigay '16, the Student Government Association (SGA) chair of residential affairs, brought the idea to our SGA and began planning with the Public Art Task Force subcommittee. Members of SafetyNet, a peer education group within the Think S.A.F.E. (Sexual Assault Free Environment) office were brainstorming ideas on how to bring the movement to our campus. At the same time, the sophomore seminar class “Art of Protest: Occupy ___” was also inspired to bring the movement to campus. In a phenomenally successful collaboration, all three groups came together to organize our College's participation in the day of action. Representatives from each group met, and off we went. “This is how things need to happen at Connecticut College: authentically and passionately,” said Bigay.

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Tags:  |  The Experience, Clubs & Orgs  |  The Experience, On Campus

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My Super Bowl experience

February 10, 2014  |  Guest Blogger

Occasionally, The ConnCollegeLive Experience will invite guests to blog about their experiences as a Camel. The following is part of this guest blogger series.

At the beginning of this month, I had the opportunity to work on the ESPN production team for the week of the Super Bowl. The job landed me in Times Square, NYC, where I worked at Times Square Studios (TSS), the location in which we shot our Sportscenter shows, and a variety of other stories, for the week.

During the fall, I worked for ESPN on College Friday Night football games at both Boston College and UCONN. I originally got the position through close family friend and alumna Caroline Davis ’99. Caroline is a production manager for ESPN, and works primarily with Monday Night Football, PGA and the major tennis tournaments across the world. She set me up with the hiring team for ESPN, who contacted me to work my first game in September at Boston College. After connecting with the staff and meeting a wonderful group of people, they set me up with the production staff that invited me to work Super Bowl week.

‌I worked at TSS each day from 7:30 a.m.-5:30p.m., helping our studio production manager and talent producers make sure everything went according to schedule. We covered live Sportscenter hits, as well as different taping and live hits for The Scott Van Pelt and Rusillo Show, Highly Questionable and Numbers Never Lie. My job was to ensure that talent got from the front doors of the studio, to hair and makeup and onto set on time.

Although I did have to miss a week of school to participate in this work, I think that it was certainly worth it (sorry, Professors!). During the week, I not only met some of the best and most legendary football players in the NFL, but so many amazing people within production and operations from both the ABC and ESPN groups. As a senior who is approaching graduation, I am quickly learning that for where I want to be after graduation it is not necessarily what you know, but who you know, that gets you there. Making connections this week already provided me with a potential job offer, as well as a good deal of contacts in the industry that I can get in touch with as I am trying to decide where I want to end up when I leave in May.

 

Patty Shields '14 is a Psychology-Based Human Relations major, and has been studying Sports Communications. Through her work in the Sports Information Office, Patty manages the Camel Athletics social media outlets, including @CamelAthletics on Twitter.

 

Behind the scenes of ESPN

Hannah Storm interviews AJ Hawk on the SportsCenter set (left,) and a behind-the-scenes view of anchors Hannah Storm, Mark Schelerth and Merril Hoge.

 

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Tags:  |  The Experience, Athletics  |  The Experience, Career & Internships

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Advocating for a different way of learning

January 13, 2014  |  Guest Blogger

Occasionally, The ConnCollegeLive Experience will invite guests to blog about their experiences as a Camel. The following is the first in this guest blogger series.

I’ve been a tutor at Conn for the past three years. I work with students in the Science Leaders program in one-on-one and group sessions in chemistry, organic chemistry and biology. The tutoring program was started as a way to ensure our Science Leaders excel, but after last summer, I saw it also as an opportunity to experiment with new teaching techniques.

Traditionally, our group tutoring sessions work this way: Students arrive with their problem sets complete and ask the tutor any questions they have. Faculty and students approve of this type of setup because students can try the problems on their own, and anyone who needs extra help attends the tutoring sessions.

Unfortunately, the system never seemed to work out this way. Many times, students come to sessions without the problem set complete, either because they couldn’t find the time, or worse, they became irreversibly stuck at some point in the assignment.

This summer, while I was applying to medical schools, I found that most incorporate problem-based learning (PBL) into their curriculum. I sat in on a PBL class for biochemistry at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and it was incredible. Students worked together on complex problems in teams of five, always making sure everyone was on pace and fully understood the question at hand. The strangest thing was, they seemed to actually enjoy it.

So I gathered up our Science Leaders in organic chemistry, and I tried it. This year, rather than stringing together a number of chapter-related problems each week, we started designing problems that pull from multiple chapters and allow the students to make connections between what they are currently working on and older material.

These new sessions foster collaboration between students and teach them that even in organic chemistry, each one of them can benefit from working together.

Yumi Kovic ’14 is a biochemistry major, a Science Leader and the winner of the prestigious Goldwater Scholarship, which encourages outstanding students to pursue careers in science, mathematics or engineering.

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Tags:  |  The Experience, Academics  |  The Experience, On Campus  |  The Experience, Research

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