The Experience, Career & Internships


Tutoring at the Writing Center

January 7, 2015  |  The Experience, Anique Ashraf '17  |  The Experience, Anique Ashraf '17

The College's Roth Writing Center offers free peer tutoring on papers and drafts for all students on campus. One becomes a tutor after being recommended to Professor Steven Shoemaker, the director of the center, after which there is an interview, a callback and a class offered in the Fall called "The Teaching of Writing." It's a 300-level English seminar. I was recommended last year by two professors, and went for my interview. (I wore my brightest paisley shirt, in an effort to be memorable.) Since English is not my first language, I want to help other non-native English speakers feel empowered through writing. I'm taking the seminar now, and as the semester winds down, the writing center is in need for more tutors. So the week before Thanksgiving, I had my first appointment. I was to tutor for the first time, finally, after the long, long process. I walked into the center five minutes early, set up my folder, took out my pen, and waited.

My first student was a first-year student who needed help with his first-year seminar. The center works this way: We ask the students to read their paper or draft out loud. If the student isn't comfortable reading aloud, we'll read it for them. The motto is to make sure the student is in the driver's seat; the tutor is a road guide, a map to the destination that the student must find themselves. I took notes as he read.

Collaborating with the tutee, working on problems, is a huge part of the job. The goal is to nudge, to prod students in a direction where their own thinking gets expanded, and to give them ideas, not to impose. This is hard for me; I love imposing myself on people most of the time. I have a specific way in which I do things, and this makes me a bit stubborn sometimes. I had to reign that in super hard when I was tutoring, and the results were a clear indication that this was the right philosophy. The student left with a better understanding of the paper, his assignment and what he might do better.

I left with an understanding of my own role in this, which is — and should be — minimal. I left with a better understanding of how my professors must feel when students don't understand what they're trying to do. Their job is hard. A teacher doesn't teach knowledge, I discovered. They teach the process of knowledge. The knowledge must be acquired oneself. I left knowing that our jobs as students are also hard: We have to come to conclusions ourselves, with the road map of learning in front of us. The destination is ours to conquer. This is a responsibility I felt heavy on my shoulders as I walked out, but it gave me more incentive to learn vicariously. If I'm being trusted as a student to make my own contribution, the responsibility also gave me agency. And students need agency to learn creatively. Most of all, I left with a giant amount of respect for this learning environment. If one doesn't take responsibility for one's own learning, everything falls apart. You can flourish or you can fail. The decision is in your hands, and that's kind of liberating. It means you're taken seriously. That's the path to adulthood, not regurging knowledge. It felt good to know.

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Art Trip to New York City

January 2, 2015  |  The Experience, Anique Ashraf '17  |  The Experience, Anique Ashraf '17

The Sophomore Research Seminar I'm taking this semester has been rife with interactive learning. Titled "Visioning the Invisible," the course focuses on secrecy, power and privilege as it relates to studio art and art history. It's funded by the Mellon Mays foundation and two professors, Denise Pelletier from Studio Art and Chris Steiner from Art History, teach it together. Already this semester, we've had a magician in our class and a professor from UConn talking about surveillance and pornography. We've also been working on small projects that will add up to a larger research paper/studio art project that we submit at the end of the semester. The best part of the seminar was, no doubt, a trip to New York City to look at "invisible" or "secret" art; I've been excited for this trip for a while.

We gathered outside Cummings Art Center at 8 a.m. on a Saturday to catch a bus to the city; our first stop was the Museum of Sex, curated by Sarah Forbes, who happens to be a Connecticut College graduate. The many exhibitions on display included one about non-heterosexual behavior amongst animals, chastity devices from the 19th century, and a critical look at Linda Lovelace (the first mainstream pornstar) and her involvement in the anti-pornography movement.

The most interesting exhibition, to me, was an interactive one, where spectators had to walk inside a mirror maze and climb a wall, where instead of rocks, one had to grab various human body parts (made of foam, of course). After we were finished at the museum, we went for lunch (generously paid for by the Mellon Mays foundation) in Chinatown, where we met "Inspector Collector" artist Harley Spiller, who collects and exhibits take-out menus, coins and plastic spoons, finding the beauty in the ordinary. We talked to him about the history of Chinatown and visited what was once a place where rival Chinese gangs used to fight each other in the early 20th century. 

We also visited the Mmmuseumm, which is a museum built in an abandoned elevator in Chinatown; the museum itself is kind of secretive and only known to those told about it. It houses a collection of forgotten art objects: soil from Auschwitz, plastic spoons from the '70s, kitsch art objects that were not remembered. I spoke with the person there; everybody volunteers to work there, and has other jobs. It's a collection of fairly young college graduates who hope to make seen the unseen.

We ended with a trip to the art supply store and various bookstores, where both Denise Pelletier, my professor, and I gushed over art supplies. We got back to campus around 10 p.m., exhausted, but filled with knowledge. Not only was this great for my class, it gave me a chance to get to know my professors a little better, go to secret places I would never have discovered otherwise, and explore, in life, art. One can't truly study art without being in its presence, and I'm glad to have taken a class that understands and reinforces that. It was a pretty fantastic experiences.

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Our trip to the National #CollegeMedia14 Conference

November 12, 2014  |  The Experience, Dana Sorkin '16  |  The Experience, Dana Sorkin '16


As the two senior staff members of The College Voice, Connecticut College's student newspaper, Editor-in-Chief Ayla Zuraw-Friendland '15 and I attended the American Collegiate Press' annual National College Media Conference. This conference allowed us to meet journalism students and professors (as well as many professional journalists) and gave us new insight into how we can continue to improve all aspects of The College Voice.



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Less than appetizing facts about fish ...

November 10, 2014  |  The Experience, Mike Wipper '17  |  The Experience, Mike Wipper '17

I'll admit, my title is a little misleading. Restaurant proprietor and College Trustee David Barber '88 and Sean Barrett, co-founder of Dock to Dish, hosted a discussion about what they envision as the ideal future of the fishing industry in the United States. While they both explained what they are working toward — fostering a culture of sustainable fisheries — what stood out to me was the appalling state of the current system of commercial fishing. David gave an explanation of how, due to tariffs and working costs, it's cheaper for a company to fish in local East Coast waters, freeze and ship the fish to China for processing, and ship the fish back to the United States, than it is to process in the same region where the fish was caught. Even with all this travel, the fish can still be legally called "locally caught." It's certainly reassuring for me to know that people like David and Sean are working to change this model by supporting and buying directly from fishermen who prepare the fish in the same local waters from which the animals are found.


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Beyond the classroom: Video chatting with a Professor

November 1, 2014  |  The Experience, Alex Breakstone '16  |  The Experience, Alex Breakstone '16

“Hey, is it alright if we call our professor in here?”

After hearing that odd request in the late hours of the night, I continued working on my homework in one of the Cummings Art Center classrooms, sharing the study space with others. Promptly, three girls began video chatting with their art history professor in preparation for a test. They spent the next hour asking questions and having a conversation with the professor.

I had never met these students, but I found it interesting to overhear their deeply intellectual conversation. It was not surprising that a professor put such effort into helping students better understand the subject.

This summer, as I was interning in New York City at a boutique public relations firm, I ran into a past professor of mine, Sunil Bhatia, in the middle of Manhattan and we ended up grabbing a cup of coffee during my lunch break. He was able to provide helpful advice as I continued my internship. Recently, he wrote a recommendation on my behalf for my study abroad application to Milan.

Professors, it seems, have a way of helping to challange and educate students, regarless of where you might run into them or how you might communicaticate with them.

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Volunteering at the Treworgy Planetarium

October 22, 2014  |  The Experience, Oliver Ames '17  |  The Experience, Oliver Ames '17

If you’ve read my bio or seen my past blog posts, you’ll notice I am very passionate about science and education. If you haven’t, that's OK — I’ll fill you in. I love science because of how romantic it can be. The idea that there is an infinite cosmos or that there are single-cell organisms wows me. It blows my mind that we have been to the moon and mapped Mars when only a few hundred years ago Lewis and Clark were exploring the vast wilderness of North America. As such, it has been a longstanding desire of mine to share my enthusiasm for science. I want to teach people why science is so fantastic and make them equally excited and awed by the world around us.
 
If it wasn’t for my professors, I might never have connected my interests of education and science. I knew in high school that I loved to present and I know that teaching comes naturally to me, but I had never thought about applying those skills towards a subject I love so much. My astronomy professor pointed me in the right direction. Aligning my passions of presenting and astronomy, she suggested I volunteer at the Treworgy Planetarium, part of the nearby Mystic Seaport. She recommended me to the director of the planetarium and, within a few weeks, I was learning how to give my own shows. 
 
While we have telescopes and viewing opportunities on campus, having a planetarium near the College is an incredible resource. The night sky not only allows us to understand the history of cultures on Earth, but also helps us understand the origins of our solar system, stars and much more. I don't believe any education is complete without an understanding of what is above us at all times. We often get trapped in our little worlds as we go about our day-to-day life, and it is important to look up and realize what is just beyond our grasp.
 
After watching two shows every Saturday for the past three weeks, I’m beginning to get the hang of things. This Saturday will be my first solo show in the Treworgy Planetarium. I’ll be giving half of a 35-minute performance (as I like to call them). I plan on making my shows theatrical in nature, as those seem to be the performances that grip people the most. I’ll be doing so in a way that takes the audience on a journey through the stars. 

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An unconventional form of museum studies

September 26, 2014  |  The Experience, Oliver Ames '17  |  The Experience, Oliver Ames '17

As a sophomore, I'll soon need to declare my major. At the beginning of this year — only three weeks ago — I was panicking, trying to pinpoint an answer to the question, "What interests you?" Before the summer started, I thought I had my plans worked out but, suddenly, I wasn't so sure. When I began to feel unsure about the path I was taking, I turned to almost every professor I had ever connected with. I received incredible support, and I'm again confident in my next steps.

Professor of Physics Leslie Brown had some great advice for me. She listened to my concerns about my challenges with physics. I had begun to feel that lab work, which lacks communication, was too dull and the classroom felt too conventional. “Doc” Brown suggested that I continue to minor in astronomy but think about self-designing a major that incorporates multiple areas of physics and science education, which made me think further about the possibility of also pursuing the Museum Studies Certificate program. I quickly set up an appointment with the program's director, Professor Chris Steiner, and he welcomed the idea of a science-oriented person joining the program. Doc Brown and Professor Steiner also connected me with staff at the Treworgy Planetarium at the Mystic Seaport, only a few miles away, so I could include practical work into my self-designed education.

In a matter of weeks, I have gone from panic to excitement, feeling like I once again have a strong path to follow. At the moment, it looks like the education plan I'm developing will include a self-designed major in science education, a minor in astronomy and a certificate in museum studies, along with volunteer work at the planetarium. With help from my professors, I've bent the definition of museum studies and altered the stereotypical path of a science student to fit my own interests in a hands-on and unconventional way.

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A day at the United Nations

April 18, 2014  |  The Experience, Alexis Cheney '16  |  Sust Blog, Alexis Cheney '16  |  The Experience, Alexis Cheney '16

Last Wednesday, I woke up at 5:20 a.m., destined for the United Nations headquarters in New York City. Giddy with fatigue and excitement, a group of us from Knowlton House met in the foyer and jaunted over to our bus, complementing one another on our business-casual attire on the way.

I sat with my friend Leela. Both French fanatics, we chatted in French as we ate a breakfast of bagels, muffins and croissants. A snooze and a few traffic jams later, we arrived at the United Nations.

We first entered the building for the United States mission to the U.N. There, we met with Alexis Wichowski, a Connecticut College alumna from the Class of 1993. She transitioned from a Chinese major in college to a graduate program in information technology to a job at the U.N. related to IT diplomacy. She also works as a professor at Columbia University. In addition to describing her career path, she quizzed us on the U.N. How many member states compose the U.N.? 193! When was the U.N. founded? 1945! She insisted we understand the U.N. as a collection of entities that include its six deliberative councils and non-governmental organizations among others.

Isaac, an intern at the U.S. mission to the U.N., left us with a final note: “Don’t start at the bottom, start at the top.”

Some people took Isaac’s advice when attacking the buffet at the Delegates Dining Hall, starting with dessert and ending with lunch. No matter our dining approach, we ate more like kings and queens than like delegates.

Fortunately, a grand tour of the U.N. helped us work off the decadence. A Swedish tour guide led our group, which pleased Julia, a Swedish Conn student studying human rights and the media. Our guide showed us the rooms where the General Assembly and other branches of the U.N. convene. In fact, we witnessed the Economic and Social Council in action!

We also had time to engage in conversation with delegates while visiting the Iranian Mission to the U.N. After an informational video and some Iranian snacks, we showered the Iranian delegates with questions: How does Iran portray women in the media? What is Iran’s stance regarding the war in Syria? What would Iran prioritize in a security council meeting? Do women participate as actively in society as men? In response to our questions, one of the delegates urged us again and again to visit Iran and to discover the answers to our questions first-hand and individually.

After collecting food-for-thought at the Iranian mission, we headed out for a delicious French meal and met up with some NYC-based Conn alums.

After a day like Wednesday, Conn’s commitment to an international education certainly takes on a magic meaning for me.

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Sitting in OVCS

February 13, 2014  |  The Experience, Miguel Salcedo '14  |  The Experience, Miguel Salcedo '14

Pictured is my friend Gaby, a senior, working as a community service assistant in the Office of Volunteers for Community Service (OVCS.) OVCS is a great way for students to go into the New London community and volunteer at sites including day cares, soup kitchens, and senior centers. Apart from connecting students to the community and providing transportation to these sites, OVCS offers work study jobs to students in the form of community service assistants and community site drivers. The office is a professional yet relaxed setting. We are able to sit in the office and work on homework, read, or talk and joke amongst ourselves while we wait for our next ride.


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My Super Bowl experience

February 10, 2014  |  Guest Blogger  |  Guest Blogger

Occasionally, The ConnCollegeLive Experience will invite guests to blog about their experiences as a Camel. The following is part of this guest blogger series.

At the beginning of this month, I had the opportunity to work on the ESPN production team for the week of the Super Bowl. The job landed me in Times Square, NYC, where I worked at Times Square Studios (TSS), the location in which we shot our Sportscenter shows, and a variety of other stories, for the week.

During the fall, I worked for ESPN on College Friday Night football games at both Boston College and UCONN. I originally got the position through close family friend and alumna Caroline Davis ’99. Caroline is a production manager for ESPN, and works primarily with Monday Night Football, PGA and the major tennis tournaments across the world. She set me up with the hiring team for ESPN, who contacted me to work my first game in September at Boston College. After connecting with the staff and meeting a wonderful group of people, they set me up with the production staff that invited me to work Super Bowl week.

‌I worked at TSS each day from 7:30 a.m.-5:30p.m., helping our studio production manager and talent producers make sure everything went according to schedule. We covered live Sportscenter hits, as well as different taping and live hits for The Scott Van Pelt and Rusillo Show, Highly Questionable and Numbers Never Lie. My job was to ensure that talent got from the front doors of the studio, to hair and makeup and onto set on time.

Although I did have to miss a week of school to participate in this work, I think that it was certainly worth it (sorry, Professors!). During the week, I not only met some of the best and most legendary football players in the NFL, but so many amazing people within production and operations from both the ABC and ESPN groups. As a senior who is approaching graduation, I am quickly learning that for where I want to be after graduation it is not necessarily what you know, but who you know, that gets you there. Making connections this week already provided me with a potential job offer, as well as a good deal of contacts in the industry that I can get in touch with as I am trying to decide where I want to end up when I leave in May.

 

Patty Shields '14 is a Psychology-Based Human Relations major, and has been studying Sports Communications. Through her work in the Sports Information Office, Patty manages the Camel Athletics social media outlets, including @CamelAthletics on Twitter.

 

Behind the scenes of ESPN

Hannah Storm interviews AJ Hawk on the SportsCenter set (left,) and a behind-the-scenes view of anchors Hannah Storm, Mark Schelerth and Merril Hoge.

 

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Creative writing in the community

January 30, 2014  |  The Experience, Alexis Cheney '16  |  Sust Blog, Alexis Cheney '16  |  The Experience, Alexis Cheney '16

With my love of creative writing and my interest in serving the community, I have begun volunteering at Sound Community Services, a non-profit organization that helps individuals with behavioral needs gain independence. It’s a place where I continue to learn about New London and individuals with behavioral health needs.

The College’s OVCS (the Office of Volunteering and Community Services) helps match students with volunteer opportunities and arranges for vans to transport volunteers to and from their sites. For the first time last semester, the van dropped me off at Sound Community Services. Cynthia, the program director, greeted me warmly. Having told her I intend to major in English, she suggested that I help out with Friday morning creative writing workshops.

I had no idea that, only one week later, I would lead the workshop single-handedly. Fortunately, I had arrived prepared, and I handed out a poem, “Where I’m From” by George Ella Lyon, to the five participants. We read the poem aloud, then we each wrote poems describing where we come from, both literally and figuratively. These poems conveniently helped the group get to know one another. As much as I love learning about the backgrounds of the patients, I also enjoy hearing their fiction pieces.

On Halloween, I copied an exercise that Professor Boyd (an author and professor of English at Conn) uses in her creative writing courses. I prompted my students to invent the age, profession, and gender of an imaginary person, to write these traits on the page, and to share the page with a partner who would then write a story about the fictive person.

The stories that came out of the exercise were out of this world. Outer space, God, free weights, after-work rituals and, yes, a few ghosts all came into the mix.

The workshop took another festive turn with the approach of Thanksgiving. I prompted participants to make a list of what they were thankful for. Friday mornings at Sound Community Services made the top of my list.

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An hour of CELS

January 2, 2014  |  The Experience, Laura Cianciolo '16  |  The Experience, Laura Cianciolo '16

Just before break, I attended CELS (Career Enhancing Life Services) Workshop Four, which focused on professional communication. The CELS staff showed us techniques for writing cover letters, sending professional emails, and interviewing. Each of the seven workshops have a different goal, from completing your resume to finding your internship. If we attend all the workshops and fulfill separate requirements, we are eligible for a $3,000 stipend for an internship during the summer of our junior year.


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Applying to the Goodwin-Niering Center for the Environment

October 30, 2013  |  The Experience, Marina Stuart '16

As a sophomore, I did not think I’d already have to be considering what my senior thesis might be.

However, when you are applying to the Goodwin-Niering Center for the Environment (GNCE,) part of your application mandates a proposed thesis or senior project.

This means thinking about my future A LOT.

Thankfully I am a future-oriented person who knows what she wants to do with her life. But all of those ideas only existed in my head, and putting them down on paper with a plan for the next two and half years of college are solidifying them in a way that is a little intimidating.

On a optimistic note, you can’t say that college is not preparing students for the future, since through this process I have thought seriously about long-term goals, have had to prepare for interviews, reached out to superiors and learned how to craft a serious proposal. These are all skills you need to have in the world after college.

One of the great aspects of GNCE is that not all of the students in it are environmental majors. There are chemistry, anthropology, philosophy, even English majors, and all want to connect the environment to their major or interest.

Applying to the Goodwin-Niering Center is a great example of what most of what extracurriculars at Conn are like; a lot of hard work, but all in preparation for opportunities you would not have access to anywhere else.

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A new perspective

October 25, 2013  |  The Experience, Calli Reynolds '17  |  The Experience, Calli Reynolds '17

I check my mailbox twice a day; once in the morning and once in the afternoon. Usually, I'm most excited to receive a package, but receiving an invitation to a luncheon was even better. The invitation was from the Connecticut College Alumni of Color group and the Trustees of Color, for students of color to network with alumni of color. As a student, I saw this as a wonderful opportunity to learn something about previous members of our campus community and how their experiences could positively influence mine.

Of the many things I learned from the alumni in attendance, one thing really stood out. Everyone tells you to get good grades while having a social life. This time, the entire Connecticut College experience was stressed. Taking advantage of every resource and being involved on campus really makes a difference. It is very easy to be the student who goes to class, does their homework and hangs out with a few friends on the weekend. To be the student who, at the end of the day, experiences the college, requires effort. Conn has so much to offer its students.

I was encouraged to find something I'm passionate about and stick with it. Doing everything on campus is one way to experience the college, but another is make your own unique path. Find what you enjoy and take it where no one has before. It's all possible, you just need to make it happen.

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