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Harris is the main dining hall.

Connecticut College terms and abbreviations

  • AC: athletic center
  • Arbo: the College Arboretum
  • Conn (Conncoll): Connecticut College.
  • Cro: the College Center at Crozier-Williams (student center)
  • the Plex: Johnson, Lambdin, Park, Wright, Morrisson, Hamilton (residence halls in North campus) and Harris (main dining hall located in north campus)
  • the Quad: Blackstone, Branford, Plant (residence halls on central campus)
  • South: South Campus: Knowlton, Harkness, Jane Addams, and Freeman residence halls
  • the Green: large green area located in South campus. The correct name is the Jean C. Tempel Green, or Tempel Green.
  • WCNI: the College radio station at 91.1 FM
  • Palmer: auditorium across from Tempel Green
  • Myers Studio: Dance studio on the 3rd floor of the College Center
  • '41 Room: 1941 Room on the 2nd floor of the College Center
  • '62 Room: 1962 Room on the 1st floor of the College Center
  • Harris: main dining hall in North Campus

Academic terms

  • to cut class: skip class without a legitimate reason
  • to drop a class: withdraw from a course
  • essay exam: a type of exam that requires a long written response
  • extension: 1. a 4-digit phone number at the College, 2. a deadline extension, i.e. extra time to finish an assignment
  • F.A.: faculty adviser, a faculty member assigned to each student who helps to plan a general education program
  • I.A.: international adviser, for students who have lived in two different cultures
  • I.D.: identification card, used for access to the dinning halls into the cafeteria and as a library card
  • J-Board: the student-run judiciary board at Connecticut College, which is the main disciplinary force on campus
  • Midterm: test given in the middle of the semester
  • optional practice training: time during or after undergraduate school, in which the student may work in the U.S. with a student visa, usually one year.
  • pop quiz, pop test: unexpected, unscheduled
  • exam quiz: short test
  • S.A.: student adviser, upperclassmen assigned to each new student to help plan schedules and provide other information
  • SAC: Student Activities Council, which plans events on campus
  • seminar: small classes involving student discussions, usually held once a week
  • SGA: Student Government Association
  • Social Security Number (SSN): identification number for employment purposes
  • syllabus: schedule for class meetings and assignments
  • voice mail: voice message system on personal telephones

Common slang and terms used in everyday language

  • awesome: great and impressive
  • barbecue (BBQ): an outdoor party with food cooked on an outdoor grill that sometimes has a special "barbecue" sauce on it
  • beat around the bush: avoid speaking directly
  • a buck: a dollar
  • to chill out: to rest and relax alone or with friends
  • cash: money in the form of dollar bills or coins, not a check or money order
  • Cool: 1. adj. fashionable, stylish, and preferred; 2. an exclamation of approval, excitement, and interest; 3. as a filling remark may indicate disinterest or inattention
  • A cop: a police officer
  • A cab: a taxi
  • To cram: to study hard the night before an exam
  • To diss: to disrespect
  • phat: pronounced the same way as fat; means Nice, beautiful, cool. Eg. She is phat.
  • to drop in/by: to pay a short visit, uninvited
  • Dude: a very informal calling
  • Dawg: also a very informal calling
  • Gas: automobile fuel
  • A hassle: trouble, nuisance
  • How are you doing?: an informal greeting; the expected response is "Fine"
  • A jock: an athlete (somewhat derogatory)
  • to make up:  to complete an assignment after it's due
  • to make out: a romantic encounter with another person emphasized by pronounced physical contact
  • Date: a social romantic outing with someone that you show great interest in, usually to a movie, theatre or a restaurant.
  • Hook up: informal word for 'dating' e.g. Hook up with her
  • Mall: many stores or shops in one building or area
  • Off the top of my head: immediately, spur of the moment
  • Out of it: not feeling well, not focused
  • Phony: artificial, fake, or with pretense
  • Psyched: excited about something
  • To pull one's leg: to tease, lie, or joke
  • To pull strings: using one's influence and connections
  • A show: TV program
  • Shut up!: An informal and rude demand that somebody stop speaking or to call for silence
  • Tied up: busy, preoccupied
  • Wicked: used as an adverb to add emphasis, "Wicked cool."
  • What's up? Sup, whaz up? : A common informal greeting

Other terms

  • ATM: automatic teller machine (to withdraw or deposit cash)
  • Checking account: a kind of bank account that allows you to remove money easily by writing checks
  • CIS, Citizenship  and Immigration Services; the United States government department that used to be called INS, Immigration an Naturalization Services (INS)
  • Savings account: a kind of bank account that accumulates interest over time.
  • Employment Authorization Document (EAD): an essential document if you wish to work.
  • I-20: a crucial document that is issued by the College and proves that you are a student. It allows you to re-enter the U.S. after travel abroad.
  • Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS): the U. S. government department in charge of foreign nationals which is now called the CIS, Citizenship and Immigration Services
  • PIN: personal identification number used with bankcards, phone services, security systems.

Conversions

  • 1 km = 0.6214 mile
  • 1 mile = 1.6093 km
  • 1 inch = 2.54 cm
  • 1 foot = 12 inches = 0.3048 m
  • 1 yard = 3 feet = 0.9144 m
  • 1 acre = 4046.48 square meters
  • 1 U.S. gallon = 3.7854 l
  • 1 l = 1 cubic dm = 0.2642 U.S. gal
  • 1 U.S. gallon = 2 quarts = 8 pints = 16 cups = 128 fluid oz.
  • 1 teaspoon (tsp.) = 5 ml
  • 3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon (tbs.)
  • 16 tbs. = 1 cup
  • 1 kg = 2.2046 lb.
  • 1 ounce (oz.) = 28.350 g
  • 1 pound (lb.) = 16 oz. = 0.4356kg
  • 1 mph (mile per hour) = 1.6093km/h
  • Degrees Celsius = (degrees Fahrenheit - 32) x 5/9
  • Degrees Fahrenheit = degrees Celsius x 9/5 + 32
  • 20 degrees Celsius is about 70 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 100 degrees Fahrenheit is normal body temperature
  • 32 degrees Fahrenheit is the freezing point of water
  • Standard U.S. electric current is 110-120V and 60Hz.

Appliances that run on 220- 240V do not work well or may be damaged unless you use a current-conversion kit. Similarly, appliances that are dependent on current frequency may malfunction without proper transformation.