Psychology



Professors:  Chrisler, Nier, Singer, Vyse, Zakriski; Associate Professor:  Schroeder; Visiting Instructor:  Khairallah; Adjunct Assistant Professors:  Armey, Carney, Didie, Sprouse; Senior Lecturer:  Gorman; Visiting Lecturer:  Marshall; Professor Devlin Acting chair (Fall 2014), Associate Professor Grahn, chair (Spring 2015)

The Major in Psychology

The major consists of at least eleven courses.  Students who choose this major must elect Courses 100, 201, 202; two courses from the clinical area:  205, 210, 301, 305, 309, 316, 326, 405, 419, 423, 441 or 442; two courses from the social area:  203, 206, 208, 304, 310, 318, 320, 321, 325, 335, 337, 340, 341, 450, 493A, 494A; two courses from the experimental area:  204, 212, 214, 215, 307, 311, 314, 322, 332, 336, 343, 406, 407, 409, 426, 493D, 494D; and two electives.   A score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Psychology Examination or its equivalent may exempt a student from Course 100.  This exemption requires the student to choose an additional course for the major to reach the required eleven courses.  The six courses chosen to fulfill the three areas (clinical, social, experimental) may include no more than three courses at the 200 level.  For the electives students may choose any 200- to 400-level course in the Psychology Department.  Human Development 302, 306, 307, or 321 may be used for one of the electives.  One of the eleven courses for the major must be a seminar (Psychology 304, 305, 309, 325, 330, 335, 337, 340 or any 400-level course), a 400 level individual study, or honors study.

The Minor in Psychology

The minor consists of Course 100, and four other courses at the 200 level or higher.  At least one 300- or 400-level course must be taken.

Advisers:  J. Chrisler, A. Devlin, J. Gorman, R. Grahn, T. Khairallah, J. Marshall, J. Nier, J. Schroeder, J. Singer, S. Vyse, A. Zakriski

Behavioral Neuroscience

The interdisciplinary major in Behavioral Neuroscience is offered jointly by the Psychology and Biology Departments and is intended to fill the needs of students seeking understanding of the biological bases of behavior.  It guides the student toward investigation of physiological, genetic, structural, developmental, and evolutionary foundations of human and non-human animal behavior.  See listing under Behavioral Neuroscience.  J. Schroeder, director

Learning Goals in the Psychology Major

The Psychology major is based on the premise that the discipline involves a broad-based understanding of Psychology as both a social science and as a natural science.  The major is structured to enable students to identify and discuss key concepts, theories, and leaders in physiological, sensation and perception, behavioral, cognitive, health, social, personality, developmental, and clinical psychology.

FOUNDATIONS

Students will:

  • display a capacity for critical thinking through analysis of scientific literature
  • develop a recognition of the importance of diversity (e.g., race, ethnicity, class, gender, age, sexual orientation, etc.) in understanding human behavior
  • have knowledge of the ethical responsibilities of the scholarly discipline and profession of psychology

METHODS

Students will:

  • gain knowledge of research design and acquire skills in statistical analysis for both correlational and experimental studies in psychology
  • design, execute, and report on an independent research investigation
  • demonstrate ability with relevant electronic databases and statistical software programs

AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE

Students will:

  • understand how psychologists study human behavior with particular attention to three broad subject areas: social psychology, clinical psychology, and experimental psychology
  • master key concepts, theories, and controversies in these three areas
  • gain an understanding of the methods and responsibilities of the profession of psychology
  • demonstrate proficiency in literature review, analysis, and scientific writing in the tradition of this discipline

ADVANCED STUDY

Students will:

  • conduct advanced analysis of topics by completing at least three upper-level courses spread among at least two of the three broad areas described earlier
  • critique prominent theoretical models, describe advanced research methods and findings, and outline the associated professional and scholarly issues

GRADUATE STUDY AND CAREER PREPARATION

Students will:

  • be prepared for graduate study and/or employment in psychology or in a variety of psychology-related disciplines and positions

Courses

PSYCHOLOGY  100  INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY  An introduction to the scientific study of human thought, feeling, and behavior emphasizing bio-psycho-social integration.  Topics include neurological functions, sensation and perception, language and cognition, conditioning and learning, motivation and emotion, development, personality, social processes, psychopathology, and psychotherapy.  Weekly laboratory sessions provide an introduction to scientific methods of studying behavior.

                Three lectures; three hours laboratory work.  Open to first year students and sophomores without prerequisite; and to juniors and seniors with permission of the instructor.  Preference given to Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience majors.  Enrollment limited to 15 students per laboratory section.  This course satisfies General Education Area 1.  J. Chrisler, J. Gorman, R. Grahn, T. Khairallah, J. Marshall, J. Nier, J. Schroeder, J. Singer, S. Vyse, A. Zakriski

PSYCHOLOGY  201  PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS  An examination of statistical concepts and techniques as used in the analysis of psychological data.  After surveying measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation, the course emphasizes methods of statistical inference:  confidence intervals, the t test, and the Analysis of Variance.  This course provides the technical background needed for an appreciation of the results of psychological research.

               Three lectures; two hours laboratory work.  Prerequisite:  Course 100 or Biology 106.  Offered annually.  Enrollment limited to 20 students per laboratory section.  J. Nier, S. Vyse

PSYCHOLOGY  202  RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY  A study of methods used in psychological research.  This course considers hypothesis formulation, research design, and the reporting of results.  Course requirements include a supervised research project.

               Two lectures with integrated laboratory work.  Prerequisite:  Course 201.  Offered annually.  Enrollment limited to 25 students per section.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Devlin, J. Gorman, J. Nier, S. Vyse

PSYCHOLOGY  203  PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN  Psychological theories of women's development, physiological aspects of reproduction, mental health issues of special concern to women, gender roles, and the current status of research on sex and gender.

               Prerequisite:  Course 100, Sociology 103, or Gender and Women's Studies 103.  Offered annually.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  J. Chrisler

PSYCHOLOGY  204  PSYCHOLOGY OF SLEEP  A theoretical, empirical, and experiential exploration of the physiological, neurocognitive, and functional aspects of sleep.  Topics include: psychophysiology of sleep; sleep disorders and sleep deprivation; mental processes across the sleep/wake cycle; and consciousness and dreaming.  Students will collect individual electroencephalographic sleep data and work collectively on a class sleep research project.

               Prerequisite:  Course 100.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  J. Schroeder

PSYCHOLOGY  205  PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY  A study of the development and functioning of the normal and abnormal personality.  Experimental and clinical research will be presented along with theories that are related to questions of individual difference.

               Prerequisite:  Course 100.  Offered annually.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  J. Singer

PSYCHOLOGY  206  SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY  A study of social factors in psychology and psychological factors in society, with particular reference to the psychology of social attitudes, propaganda, group dynamics, and selected social problems.

               Prerequisite:  Course 100 or one course in sociology.  Offered annually.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  J. Nier

PSYCHOLOGY  208  HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY  A study of the application of psychosocial principles to health-related issues.  Topics include patient-practitioner communication, the modification of health behaviors, stress and coping, and the management of chronic and terminal illness.

               Prerequisite:  Course 100 or permission of the instructor.  Offered in alternate years.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  J. Chrisler

PSYCHOLOGY  210  PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS AND DYSFUNCTION  An introduction to psychological disorders, their causes, and treatments.  The relevance of explanatory models from introductory psychology will be stressed using case studies and empirical research.

               Prerequisite:  Course 100.  Offered annually.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  A. Zakriski

PSYCHOLOGY  212  DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR  The effects of drugs on human behavior relating, where possible, behavioral effects to actions on the brain.  Discussion of a wide variety of drugs including those used in the treatment of mental health disorders and substances of abuse.

               Prerequisite:  Course 100 or permission of the instructor.  Offered in alternate years.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  R. Grahn, T. Khairallah

PSYCHOLOGY  214  BIOPSYCHOLOGY  An introduction to the neural basis of behavior and cognition, with an emphasis on the anatomical and developmental organization of the nervous system and the cellular basis of neural communication.  The role of neurotransmitter systems in mediating behavior and cognition will also be emphasized.  This is the same course as Biology 214.

               Two lectures.  Prerequisite:  Course 100 or Biology 106.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  R. Grahn, J. Schroeder

PSYCHOLOGY  215  SENSATION AND PERCEPTION  The anatomical, physiological, and psychological/behavioral aspects of sensation and perception.  Lectures and discussions of the basic sensory mechanisms and higher order processing of visual, auditory, tactile, and chemical information.  Emphasis on the impact of sensation and perception on development, learning and memory, cognition, and environment.

               Prerequisite:  Course 100 or Biology 106.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This course is not open to students who have received credit for Psychology 308.  J. Schroeder

PSYCHOLOGY  301  FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY  A study of issues pertaining to psychologists performing services within a legal context (criminal, civil, and family court).  Examples include the following:  the psychologist as an expert witness, the insanity defense, competence to stand trial, diminished capacity, forensic neuropsychological evaluations, and emotional factors in personal injury evaluations.  Class discussion will be facilitated by reviewing recent court cases described in the media and by discussing historically important cases that affect psychologists working within the legal system.

               Prerequisite:  Course 205 or 210, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

PSYCHOLOGY  304  SOCIAL COGNITION AND GROUP PROCESSES  An intermediate course in social psychology that examines social perception and thought, with an emphasis on its relationship to group behavior.  Topics may include attribution theory, the self, attitudes and attitude change, implicit and explicit prejudice, intergroup relations, and social cognitive neuroscience.  Readings of original social psychological research and the process of conducting research will be emphasized.

               Prerequisite:  Course 206.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered in alternate years.  J. Nier

PSYCHOLOGY  305/512  SEMINAR IN PERSONALITY RESEARCH  An examination of the research process in personality psychology.  Contemporary research in personality psychology will be examined at three levels:  1) traits or general descriptions; 2) characteristic adaptations including goals, coping strategies, and defenses; 3) identity and meaning-making, including life stories and autobiographical memories.  An examination of selected theories and research methods.  Emphasis on the development of original research projects.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 305:  Courses 201, 202, and 205.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 512.  Course 305 is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  J. Singer

PSYCHOLOGY  307  COGNITIVE PROCESSES  An examination of the organization of cognitive functioning with particular emphasis on models of thinking and the manner in which information is processed.  The areas of attention, pattern recognition, memory, retrieval, and problem solving will be considered in light of current theory and research.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Offered annually.  A. Devlin

PSYCHOLOGY  309/503  BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE  An examination of theory and practice in the field of behavioral medicine.  Emphasis will be placed on the role of mind-body interaction in physical health and illness.  Approaches to health maintenance will be discussed.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 309:  Course 208, Biology 202, or Psychology/Biology 214 or 314; or permission of the instructor.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 503.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered in alternate years.  J. Chrisler

PSYCHOLOGY  310  PSYCHOLOGY OF PREJUDICE  A seminar that will examine the social psychological origins of prejudice.  Discussions will focus on classic and contemporary understandings of prejudice and its relationship to intergroup relations, stereotyping, and discrimination.  The course will also include discussion of social psychological interventions aimed at reducing prejudice.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 and 206.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  J. Nier

PSYCHOLOGY  311  BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS  An introduction to recent advances in economics produced by the application of experimental methods from the field of psychology.  Topics will include violations of the standard economic assumptions of self-interest and maximization in the decisions and choices of individuals, consumers, investors, and borrowers.

               Prerequisite:  Course 201 or Economics 205.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Offered in alternate years.  S. Vyse

PSYCHOLOGY  314/514  BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE  Relationship between the nervous system and behavior.  Topics include sensation, sleep, language, learning, emotions, stress, and mental illness.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.  This is the same course as Biology 314.

               Two lectures and one laboratory per week.  Prerequisite for Course 314:  Psychology/Biology 214, Biology 202, or permission of the instructor.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 514.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered annually.  R. Grahn, J. Schroeder

PSYCHOLOGY  316/527  COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY  An examination of cognitive behavioral therapy from general principles to clinical applications.  Topics include cognitive behavioral assessment, therapy techniques, research in cognitive behavioral therapy, and principles of human self-regulation of emotional, sexual, and addictive behavior.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 316:  Course 205, 210 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

PSYCHOLOGY  318/518  INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY  Personnel and organizational psychology examined within the context of the changing U.S. work force and international competition.  Issues include the role of women and minorities, the aging worker, the family (e.g., day care and parental leave), and cross-cultural differences in management styles.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 318:  Course 206 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Offered in alternate years.  A. Devlin

PSYCHOLOGY  320  ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY  An examination of the interaction between human behavior and the designed environment.  Emphasis on the theory and practice of environmental psychology, considering such issues as personal space and territoriality, spatial orientation and legibility, privacy and crowding, and specific building types (e.g., housing, dormitories, prisons, libraries).

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Offered in alternate years.  A. Devlin

PSYCHOLOGY  321/521  SPORT AND EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY  An examination of the major psychological and cultural factors associated with participation in sport and exercise.  Topics include the scientific approach in sport and exercise psychology, individual differences, competition and cooperation, motivation, team processes, cognitive behavioral and behavioral methods for enhancing performance, positive and negative health aspects of participation in sport and exercise, and personal development throughout the lifespan.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 321:  Course 205, 206, or 210.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

PSYCHOLOGY  322/522  PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY  The neural substrates of pharmacology.  Focus on cellular and molecular neuropharmacology, metabolism in the CNS, receptors, modulation of synaptic transmission, and analysis of neurotransmitter systems.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.  This is the same course as Biology 322.

               Two lectures and one laboratory each week.  Prerequisite for Course 322:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Psychology/Biology 214 or Biology 202.  Course 322 is a designated Writing course.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 522.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered annually.  R. Grahn

PSYCHOLOGY  325/593B  INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS  Emphasis on contemporary research problems and their relevance to theory.  Each student undertakes extensive reviews of self-selected topics and/or undertakes research projects.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 325:  Course 201 or equivalent.  Course 202 recommended.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 593B.  Enrollment limited to 16 students. J. Chrisler

PSYCHOLOGY  326/532  DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY  An examination of childhood psychological disturbances from a developmental psychopathology framework.  Emphasis on risk and protective factors, the variety of influences that affect disturbance, and specific forms of psychological maladjustment in childhood.  Prevention and intervention discussed.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 326:  Course 210.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  A. Zakriski

PSYCHOLOGY  327  EVIDENCE-BASED DESIGN:  INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 327.  Refer to the Architectural Studies Department for a course description.

PSYCHOLOGY  330  SEMINAR ON CURRENT ISSUES  Discussion of current research issues in psychology related to faculty research in the department.  Students write a substantial literature review on a topic of their choice.  The topic of the literature review will determine in which area the course may be counted to fulfill the major requirements.  Strongly recommended for students intending to do Honors Study.

               Prerequisite:  Courses 201 and 202.  Enrollment limited to 16 students; juniors given preference.  Staff

PSYCHOLOGY  332/533  COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY:  ORIGINS OF MIND AND BEHAVIOR  Development, mechanisms, evolutionary history, and function of behavior across species with emphasis on clarifying the origins of human behavior.  Topics include reproduction, parental care, territoriality, predator evasion, communication, learning, and social behavior.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 332:  Course 100 or permission of the instructor.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 533.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  J. Schroeder

PSYCHOLOGY  333, 334  SELECTED TOPICS  Advanced seminar or research study may be arranged for adequately prepared groups of students in areas of psychology not otherwise available in the undergraduate or graduate curriculum.  Selected topics may be offered at the 300 or 400 level.  400-level selected topics courses include a major research project.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.

PSYCHOLOGY  335/535  CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY  A detailed analysis of the ways in which Western sociocultural assumptions have influenced the science and practice of psychology.  Consideration will be given to how well psychological theories apply to people of diverse ethnic/cultural backgrounds and worldviews.  Topics include personality and social psychology, mental health and mental illness, counseling, and psychotherapy.  Psychology 335 is the same course as Comparative Race and Ethnicity 335.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 335:  Course 205, 206, or 210.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  T. Khairallah

PSYCHOLOGY  336/536  NEUROBIOLOGY OF DISEASE  Analysis of the neuropathology and behavioral dysfunction of neuropathology and psychiatric disorders.  Focus on etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment strategies aimed at prevention, symptom alleviation, and restoration of function.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.  This is the same course as Biology 336.

               Prerequisite for Course 336:  Psychology/Biology 214 or Biology 202.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 536.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  R. Grahn, J. Schroeder

PSYCHOLOGY  337/537  EXPERIMENTAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY  An examination of the research process in social psychology.  Selected research methods and theories in social psychology will be reviewed.  Data analysis and writing of research reports will be emphasized.  Course requirements include a project for which students will design an original study.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 337:  Courses 201, 202, and 206.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  J. Nier

PSYCHOLOGY  340/593C  PSYCHOLOGY OF MEN AND MASCULINITY  Psychological theories of the development of masculinities, men and violence, mental health issues of special concern to men, men's sexuality and relationships, and biopsychosocial influences on men's physical health.  This is the same course as Gender and Women's Studies 340.

               Prerequisite:  Course 203 or 206; or Gender and Women's Studies 103; or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  T. Khairallah

PSYCHOLOGY  341/541  PEER RELATIONSHIPS AND DEVELOPMENT  An examination of peer relationships from toddlerhood through adolescence.  Emphasis on the various types of peer experiences and the related individual and group processes that shape them; relationships between peer experiences and self-perceptions; positive and negative effects of peer relationships on social and emotional development; and school-based interventions designed to enhance children's peer relationships and psychological well-being.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 341:  Courses 100 and 206.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  A. Zakriski

PSYCHOLOGY  343/543  COGNITIVE BRAIN IMAGING  An examination of how cutting-edge brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET can be used to study how the brain executes complex cognitive functions such as attention, memory, visual thinking, and language comprehension.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 343:  Course 202 or permission of the instructor.  Course 307 or Psychology/Biology 214 is recommended.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 543.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  J. Schroeder

PSYCHOLOGY  346/546  PSYCHOTHERAPY MODELS AND INTEGRATION  A survey of major areas of psychological therapy from Freud to modern third-wave Cognitive Behavioral Therapies.  Students will learn to compare and contrast various schools of psychotherapy, and examine the shared components of effective psychological interventions.  Modern integrative perspectives will be examined including Prochaska  and Norcross′ Transtheoretical Framework.

               Prerequisite for course 346:  Course 205 or 210.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  M. Armey

PSYCHOLOGY  405/505  SEMINAR IN PSYCHOPATHOLOGY  An examination of major categories of psychological disorders, including schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, and personality disorders, with emphasis on current psychopathology research.  Current controversies will be considered, including approaches to diagnostic classification, causal explanations, and treatment issues.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 405:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Course 210.    Enrollment limited to 16 students.  A. Zakriski

PSYCHOLOGY  406  IRRATIONAL BEHAVIOR  Psychology of behavior that is irrational yet not abnormal.  Philosophical, economic, and psychological theories of rationality.  Research in sub-optimal choice, biased decision-making, and cognitive heuristics applied to common behavioral phenomena, including irrational gambling, problems of self-control, and paranormal belief.

               Prerequisite:  Courses 100 and 201.  Open to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  S. Vyse

PSYCHOLOGY  407/507  ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS  Statistical principles of research design with primary emphasis on analysis of variance models.  Other parametric procedures and nonparametric techniques are selectively reviewed for application to particular descriptive and inferential problems.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 407:  Courses 201 and 202.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered annually.  J. Nier, S. Vyse

PSYCHOLOGY  409/509  BEHAVIORAL ENDOCRINOLOGY  Topics include the influence of steroid action on motivated behaviors, cognitive function, and affective processes.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.  This is the same course as Biology 409.

               Prerequisite for Course 409:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Psychology/Biology 214 or Biology 202.  Course 409 is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  R. Grahn

PSYCHOLOGY  410  THE PSYCHOLOGY OF FREE WILL  An evaluation of the arguments for and against the reality of conscious will, with particular attention to evidence from recent psychological research.  Also addressed will be the social implications of a world with or without free will.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  S. Vyse

PSYCHOLOGY  419/519  ADVANCED CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY  Seminar on essential issues in the science and practice of clinical psychology.  Topics include assessment, psychotherapy models and techniques, professional ethics, cultural and gender issues, and developments in the fields of psychotherapy research and psychotherapy integration.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 419:  Course 210 or permission of the instructor.  Open to juniors and seniors.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 519.  Course 419 is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  J. Singer, A. Zakriski

PSYCHOLOGY  423/523  COUPLES AND FAMILY THERAPY  An examination of couples therapy and family therapy from general principles to clinical applications.  Topics include assessment, therapy techniques, and research in couples and family therapy.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 423:  Course 210.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 523.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  J. Singer

PSYCHOLOGY  426/526  PSYCHOLOGY OF STRESS  Psychological and physiological concomitants.  The relationship of stress to phenomena such as fear, anxiety, emotion, aggression, and susceptibility to disease will be examined.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 426:  Open to juniors and seniors who have taken Course 309 or Psychology/Biology 214, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Course 426 is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  J. Chrisler, R. Grahn

PSYCHOLOGY  441/539, 442/540  PRACTICUM IN CLINICAL AND COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY  Supervised practicum in clinical and community psychology.  Students work 10-12 hours per week in supervised field placements in hospitals, child guidance clinics and other community agencies.  Selections for the academic year are made the preceding spring.  Participation is typically for a full academic year.  Students electing 441, 442 must concurrently register for the Seminar in Clinical and Community Psychology, 441A, 442A.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

                Prerequisite for Course 441/442:  Course 210 and permission of the supervising faculty member and agency director.  Priority given to senior majors in psychology.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered annually.  A. Zakriski, J. Singer

PSYCHOLOGY  441A, 442A  SEMINAR IN CLINICAL AND COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY  An examination of the theory and practice of psychology through its focus on approaches to mental health and deviant behavior.  Issues in clinical and community psychology are considered in weekly seminars.

        Prerequisite:  Open to students who have been selected for the Practicum in Clinical and Community Psychology 441, 442.  Two credit hours.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  J. Singer, A. Zakriski

PSYCHOLOGY  450/550  SEMINAR IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY  An in-depth discussion of selected topics in social psychology.  Topics may include social cognition, group processes, prejudice and discrimination, and applications of social psychology to public policy.  Emphasis on the discussion of research from the major journals in the field.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 450:  Course 206.  Permission of the instructor is required for Course 550.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  J. Nier, J. Chrisler

PSYCHOLOGY  451/551  GERIATRIC PSYCHOLOGY  A study of the later years of human life from a multidisciplinary approach based on historical perspectives and current research on normal and impaired aging. 

This course provides students with a broad understanding of psychological processes associated with aging, including social-emotional, biopsychological, and medical features of aging; cultural and cross-cultural considerations; assessment of disability such as neurodegenerative disease; home habilitation; and personal independence.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 441:  Course 210.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  M. Cohen

PSYCHOLOGY  452/552  CLINICAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGY  An introduction to neuropsychological assessment techniques.  Topics include learning and autism spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury, and psychiatric disorders.  Discussion of practical applications of findings from evaluations.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

               Prerequisite for Course 452:  Course 210 or Psychology/Biology 214.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

PSYCHOLOGY  493, 494  ADVANCED STUDY SEMINARS

PSYCHOLOGY  493A/593A, 494A/593A  THE PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN'S HEALTH  A psychosocial analysis of selected women's health issues.  Emphasis on reproductive health, chronic illness, and public policy.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

        Prerequisite for Course 493A/494A:  Courses 203 or 208 or 309, or permission of the instructor. Permission of the instructor is required for Course 593A.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered in alternate years.  J. Chrisler

PSYCHOLOGY  493D/593D, 494D/594D  SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE  A neuroscience perspective examining cognition, with an emphasis on decision-making, memory, and mental illness.  The course will explore emerging fields, such as the use of virtual reality as a therapeutic tool.  Additional course requirements for graduate students, including an extra hour of meeting time per week, will be listed in a separate syllabus.

        Prerequisite for Course 493D/494D:  Psychology/Biology 214 or Psychology 307.  This is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  R. Grahn, J. Schroeder, Staff

PSYCHOLOGY  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

PSYCHOLOGY  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

PSYCHOLOGY  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

PSYCHOLOGY 495/496, 595/596  RESEARCH PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY  A one-semester individual study in which a student undertakes a research project off-campus for six to eight hours each week.  The project, which is coordinated by the student and a faculty sponsor, must be integrated into the student’s major curriculum and be approved by the department.  A 15-page report detailing how the practicum relates to the student's major curriculum is required.

               Prerequisite:  Course 202 and permission of the instructor.  Courses 495/496 open to juniors and seniors, courses 595/596 open to graduate students.  Staff

Individual Study may be done at the 200, 300 or 400 level at the discretion of the department.

PSYCHOLOGY  497-498  HONORS STUDY  Course 330 is strongly recommended for the spring prior to enrolling in Course 497.

Graduate Study

All master's programs in psychology consist of twelve 500-level graduate semester courses.  The student must also write a thesis, which is counted as two semester courses.  One course (Advanced Psychological Statistics) is required of all students and is normally taken in the first semester of the first year.  Students who plan to elect the clinical practicum must take Psychology 505, Seminar in Psychopathology, and Psychology 519, Advanced Clinical Psychology.  The department offers concentrations in clinical psychology, behavioral medicine/health psychology, social/personality psychology, and neuroscience/psychobiology, and instruction in abnormal and social psychology, women's health, behavioral medicine, statistics, clinical assessment, stress and emotional behavior, cognitive behavior therapy, and other areas.  Please note that all M.A. courses, despite a separate graduate course number, are held concurrently with advanced undergraduate students.  Graduate Students receive a separate syllabus with enhanced readings and requirements.  They also participate in an additional hour-long meeting each week that is exclusively for graduate students enrolled in that course.  For additional information, write to the department of psychology.

PSYCHOLOGY  591, 592  INDIVIDUAL STUDY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS  Directed reading or research in problems taken from the contemporary research literature with emphasis on topics appropriate to the student's area of study.  Staff

PSYCHOLOGY  597-598  THESIS RESEARCH  Conception of problem, collection and analysis of data, and preparation of an acceptable thesis; all work to be closely supervised by the student's thesis adviser and committee.  Pass/not passed marking.  Staff