Music



Professor:  Kreiger; Associate Professors:  Thomas, Wilson; Assistant Professors:  Moy, Seto; Adjunct Professors:  Arm, Harper, Skernick ; Adjunct Associate Professors:  McNeish, Van Cleve; Adjunct Assistant Professors:  Buttery, Clark, Ivanov, Jarvis, Johnson, Labadorf, McCormick, Noreen, Ogano, Svedaite-Waller; Adjunct Instructors:  Brown, Coyle, Frenkel, Lee, Newman, Sesma, Talmadge, Thorne; Professor Anthony, chair

The Major in Music

The major in music consists of at least ten four-credit courses, as well as at least four semesters of ensemble.  Six core courses are required:  132, 223, 229, 247, 248, and 493.  Additionally, at least one theory course must be chosen from 320, 323, or 324.  The remaining three courses will be chosen from the following:  103, 108, 117, and any 200-, 300-, or 400-level music course (only one 100-level course may be used to fulfill this area, and at least one course must be above the 200-level).

Students may elect to complete a concentration in one area of music (composition, music education, musicology, performance, or theory) by fulfilling the requirements for the major above, as well as the following coursework for their particular area of concentration:

Composition:  Students must take at least twelve four-credit courses, fulfilling the distribution above and specifically including Courses 203, 320, 331, and 332.  In addition, they must complete one of the following, culminating in a senior project:  304, 431, 432, or 497-498.

Music Education:  Students must take Courses 305A, B, C, and D, 308, 325, and a minimum of four semesters of applied study.  In addition, they must complete the state certification requirements as listed by the Education Department.

Musicology:  Students may choose either the Historical Musicology track or the Ethnomusicology track.  Students wishing to follow the Historical Musicology track must take at least twelve four-credit courses, including one course from outside of the music department that addresses the political or cultural history of the area they intend to pursue, chosen in consultation with the department.  In addition, they must complete one of the following, culminating in a senior project:  491, 492, or 497-498.  Students wishing to follow the Ethnomusicology track must take at least twelve 4-credit courses, specifically including Music 108 and Anthropology 201 (History of Anthropological Theory).  In addition, they must complete one of the following, culminating in a senior project:  491, 492, or 497-498.

Performance:  Students must take Courses 217 and 218, as well as at least ten four-credit courses.  In addition, they must complete a minimum of sixteen semester hours of Instrumental and Vocal Study (215 or 415) in a single instrument or in voice, and at least six semesters of ensemble; this must include either one or two semesters of study for four credits or 497-498, taken in consultation with the department, culminating in a senior recital.  Regular performances in student recitals during the four years are expected.

Theory:  Students must take at least twelve four-credit courses, fulfilling the distribution above and specifically including Courses 323 and 324.  In addition, they must complete one of the following, culminating in a senior project:  491, 492, or 497-498.

Students majoring in music must pass a keyboard proficiency examination by the end of the junior year.  In order to acquire this proficiency, non-keyboardists may take Basic Keyboard Skills.

The music department strongly recommends that all music majors study French, German, or Italian for the equivalent of two years at the college level.

The Minor in Music

The minor in music is offered with four areas of concentration:  composition, musicology, performance, and theory.  Students are required to take four semester hours of ensemble, as well as the following courses from their particular area of concentration:

Composition:  Courses 132, 223, and 331; either 247 or 248; either 320 or 323; and either 203 or 332.

Musicology:  Courses 132, 223, 247, 248, and two additional four-credit courses chosen in consultation with the department.

Performance:  Courses 132 and 217; two of the following:  223, 247, or 248; one additional four-credit course; and twelve semester hours of Instrumental and Vocal Study at the 215 or 415 level in a single instrument or in voice, including at least four credits taken during the senior year.

Theory:  Courses 132, 223, and 323; and either 247 or 248; and two additional four-credit courses chosen in consultation with the department.

The Major in Music and Technology

The major in music and technology consists of fourteen courses:  eleven core courses and three electives.  An integrative individual study project is also required during the senior year.  Students considering this major should consult the Department of Music no later than the beginning of their sophomore year.

Core courses:  Courses 106, 132, 203, 223, 248, 304, 331, 491, 493; one of the following:  Course 320, 323, or 324; and Computer Science 110 or 212.

Electives:  Art 103, 210, 213, 214; Art History 260, 261, 265; Computer Science 212, 215, 218, 312; Dance 238; Linguistics 110; Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 212; Philosophy 103; Physics 107, 108, 109, 110, 213; Psychology 307; Theater 231.

Students majoring in music and technology must pass a keyboard proficiency examination by the end of the junior year.  In order to acquire this proficiency, non-keyboardists may take Basic Keyboard Skills.

Adviser:  A. Kreiger

The Minor in Music and Technology

The minor in music and technology consists of Courses 106, 131, 132, 203, 223, 248, and 304.  In addition, students must complete one of the following:  Computer Science 110, 212, 218; Physics 107, 109, 213.

Learning Goals in the Music Major

Music offers a comprehensive basic major, along with the opportunity to pursue advanced study leading to a concentration in one of five areas: performance, musicology, music theory, composition, and music education with certification. In completing the major curriculum all students will develop a wide set of academic and musical proficiencies.

Knowledge Base

  • Comprehend the chief historical styles of Western music.
  • Acquire skills in fieldwork methodologies through an exposure to the discipline of ethnomusicology.
  • Develop facility with tonal and post-tonal systems, culminating in advanced training in counterpoint, analysis, and jazz harmony.

Musicianship

  • Develop skills in aural reception, sight singing, and the keyboard.
  • Perform in an ensemble.
  • Enhance musicianship skills through the private study of an instrument or voice.

Research

  • Follow a departmental information literacy sequence, leading to a knowledge of the methodologies and materials of music research.
  • Develop writing and presentation abilities.

Beyond the College

  • Prepare for a lifelong relationship with music.
  • Discover a set of vocational possibilities in the realms of performance, composition, post-graduate education and teaching, music education, and technology.

Additional Goals of the Concentrations

  • Concentration in Applied Study:  Develop advanced facility with an instrument or voice, leading to numerous performances with an ensemble and in solo recital.
  • Concentration in Musicology:  Complete advanced work on a research project, focusing either on historical musicology or ethnomusicology. Students interested in ethnomusicology will base their research on field work, done in the US or abroad.
  • Concentration in Music Theory:  Carry out advanced theoretical study in current fields, including set theory, transformational theory, and Schenkerian analysis, culminating in an extended paper.
  • Concentration in Composition:  Compose in both acoustic and electronic media as a means to understand musical pacing, structure, and logic.
  • Concentration in Music Education:  Undertake advanced study in current trends in education, human development, curriculum design, classroom management, modes of assessment, and theories of music learning, culminating in a semester of student teaching in an elementary or secondary school.  Develop extended musicianship skills including the performance and pedagogy of a range of woodwind, brass, string, and percussion instruments, and the voice, along with ensemble conducting.

Learning Goals in the Music and Technology Major

Music offers an interdisciplinary major in Music and Technology.  In addition to a core curriculum shared with the major in Music, students receive training specific to music technology and they select electives from such departments as Art, Computer Science, Film Studies, Mathematics, and Physics.  In completing the major curriculum all students will develop a wide set of proficiencies.

Knowledge Base

  • Comprehend the chief historical styles of Western music from the Classical period to the present, including electro-acoustic music.
  • Acquire a working knowledge of tonal systems and elements of modernism.
  • Develop an advanced technical knowledge of musical acoustics, recording techniques, control-voltage synthesis, and sampling and mixing software.

Creativity

  • Compose with the materials of electro-acoustic music.
  • Prepare compositions for public performance.

Musicianship

  • Develop skills in aural reception, sight singing, and the keyboard.
  • Aurally recognize significant electro-acoustic works.

Beyond the College

  • Participate in the professional world of electro-acoustic music.
  • Discover a set of vocational possibilities related to music technology.

Courses

MUSIC  102  MUSIC THROUGH TIME AND SOCIETY  A study of the significant works in music history from the Middle Ages to the present with an emphasis on developing skills for the art of listening.  Guest lectures and musical performances presented by members of the music staff.  For the student with limited or no background in music.  This course does not count toward the major in music. 

               Offered every semester.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7.  Staff

MUSIC  103  AMERICAN MUSIC  An overview of folk, popular and art music of the United States.  Topics include various musical genres and styles (e.g. ballads, ragtime, country-western, operas), the traditions of various groups (e.g. African American, British American, Native American), and contributions of such individuals as Bessie Smith, Charles Ives, George Gershwin, Amy Beach.  This is the same course as American Studies 103. 

               Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  Staff

MUSIC  104  THE LANGUAGE OF MUSIC  Designed to acquaint the student having limited or no background in performing music with the rudiments of the art.  Pitch and rhythmic notation, scales, intervals, basic chord patterns and musical forms are studied.  Ear training and basic keyboard exercises provide a practical supplement to the study.

               Enrollment limited to 25 students per section.  This course does not count toward the major or minor in music.  Students may not receive credit for both Music 104 and Music 122.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  Staff

MUSIC  106  MUSICAL ACOUSTICS  An introduction to musical acoustics using basic physical and mathematical concepts.  Topics include sound waves and propagation, vibrations, the human ear and its response, musical instruments, the human voice, and room acoustics.  Students are expected to have a knowledge of basic algebra and some familiarity with a musical instrument.

               Enrollment limited to 40 students.  J. McNeish

MUSIC  108  MUSIC OF THE WORLD  Music as cultural expression in different regions of the world, including Africa, Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Americas.  Melodic, rhythmic, and formal characteristics of music studied in various performance contexts.  Introduction to research methodologies for studying music and meaning.  No prior musical training required.  This is the same course as Anthropology 108.

               Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  J. D. Wilson

MUSIC  117  HISTORY OF JAZZ  A survey of the major movements in jazz tracing its origin and progressing from Dixieland through Bop, including the avant-garde movement of the late '60s and early '70s.  Focus on major jazz artists:  Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington and John Coltrane.  A consideration of the social and psychological implication of jazz with emphasis on listening skills.  Lectures, recordings, readings and performances when possible.  This is the same course as American Studies 117.

               Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 4.  Staff

MUSIC  122  MAKING MUSIC AT THE KEYBOARD  Scales, intervals, chords at the keyboard.  Introduction to melodic construction and harmonic progressions through exercises and selected piano pieces.  Exercises in ear training and rhythmic skills.  No previous keyboard experience required.

               Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Students may not receive credit for both Music 104 and Music 122.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  J. Anthony

MUSIC  131  FOUNDATIONAL THEORY FOR MUSICIANS  An intensive study of the rudiments of music theory, (clefs, notation, meter, key signatures, scales, intervals, triads, and seventh chords), with particular emphasis on the development of musicianship skills.  The course includes an overview of the primary musical forms, elementary compositional issues, the tools of the music library, and music notation.

               Two lectures and one ear-training session per week; students will be placed in ear-training section based on an in-class assessment.  This course is intended for students with some musical background who are able to read music fluently in at least one clef.  Prospective music majors should take this course in the fall of the first year; may be exempted with a qualifying score on a placement examination.  Enrollment limited to 25 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  Staff

MUSIC  132  TONAL THEORY I  Introduction to the harmonic practices of the 18th and 19th centuries.  Emphasis on writing skills, including figured-bass exercises and melodic harmonization, as well as on the analysis of representative works and the development of aural skills.  

               Two lectures and two ear-training sessions per week.  Tonal Theory I is normally taken by prospective majors in the second semester of the freshman year and Tonal Theory II in the first semester of the sophomore year.  Prerequisite:  Course 131 or a qualifying score on a placement examination.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  Staff

MUSIC  203  ELECTROACOUSTIC MUSIC I/SOUND DESIGN  Introduction to composing with the materials of electronic music.  Topics include:  digital sound recording, editing, mixing, analog and digital sound production, Pro Tools, voltage control synthesis and basic acoustics.  An historical overview of the literature of electronic/computer music with discussions probing aesthetic issues raised by individual compositions.  This is the same course as Arts and Technology 203.

               Two lectures and one laboratory per week.  Prerequisite:  Course 132 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  A. Kreiger

MUSIC  207  JAZZ IMPROVISATION  An introduction to jazz improvisational practice from both a performance and theoretical perspective.  Students will learn or refine basic techniques in a variety of idioms, focusing on matters of harmony, scales and modes, rhythm, and style.  The course includes listening and transcription, historical investigation, technical studies, repertoire development, and ear training.  Appropriate for students with instrumental or vocal skills and sound theoretical knowledge of keys, scales, intervals, and chords.  Parallel registration in Jazz Ensemble recommended.

               Prerequisite:  Course 131 or a qualifying score on a placement examination.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  J. Clark

MUSIC  217, 218  SERVICE-LEARNING PRACTICUM IN MUSIC  Service in an area school or after-school program or performing arts organization, to enhance understanding of music learning, instrumental or vocal pedagogy, or the music business (minimum two hours per week).  Readings and discussion of relevant issues.  Specific service placement developed in consultation with instructor.  May be repeated for credit.  Two credit hours.  Staff

MUSIC  223  TONAL THEORY II  A continuation of Tonal Theory I, with a focus on chromatic harmony and the analysis of more extended works.  Further refinement of writing skills in four-part harmony, and aural skills.  Final creative project.

               Two lectures and two ear-training sessions per week.  Tonal Theory I is normally taken by prospective majors in the second semester of the freshman year and Tonal Theory II in the first semester of the sophomore year.  Prerequisite:  Course 132.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  M. Thomas

MUSIC  225  ELEMENTARY COMPOSITION I  Introduction to composition concentrating on historical models and the development of melodic writing skills, including two-part writing and instrumentation.  Two credit hours.

               Prerequisite:  Course 131.  Staff

MUSIC  226  ELEMENTARY COMPOSITION II  Continuation of Course 225 concentrating on three- and four-part writing and the use of small ensembles.  Analysis of representative literature.  Two credit hours.

               Prerequisite:  Course 132.  Staff

MUSIC  229  ETHNOMUSICOLOGY:  THE SOCIAL SCIENCE OF MUSIC  An introduction to the discipline of ethnomusicology:  its history, methodologies, and its relationship to anthropology.  Techniques of fieldwork, readings of musical ethnographies ranging from Hip Hop to Cantonese opera.  Designed particularly for students of Music, Anthropology, Sociology, and East Asian Studies.  This is the same course as Anthropology 229.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 40 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3 and is a designated Writing course.  J. D. Wilson

MUSIC  247  HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC I  The first of a two-part survey of musical styles in Western civilization.  Focus on the music of the ancient Greeks through the Baroque period.

               Prerequisite:  Course 131 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7.  Staff

MUSIC  248  HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC II  A study of developments in Western music from the Classical period to the present.

               Prerequisite:  Course 131 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 7.  Staff

MUSIC  266  MUSICAL THEATER IN AMERICAN CULTURE  This is the same course as Theater 266.  Refer to the Theater listing for a course description.

MUSIC  304  ELECTROACOUSTIC MUSIC II  A continuation of Course 203.  Further exposure to composing with the materials of electronic music.  Topics include:  refinement of techniques presented in course 203 plus computer score notation, MIDI, digital synthesizers, and MAX/MSP.  Continued exploration of composers and compositions in the historical survey of electronic/computer music.  This is the same course as Arts and Technology 304.

               Two lectures and one laboratory per week.  Prerequisite:  Courses 203 and 223 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  A. Kreiger

MUSIC  305  INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL METHODS  A String; B Woodwind and Percussion A; C Brass and Percussion B; D Vocal Pedagogy and Choral Conducting

Instrumentals: An introduction to the teaching of instruments, including rudimentary instrumental technique, pedagogy, and care of instruments.  Discussion of teaching resources and ensemble leadership.  Some proficiency will be achieved on each instrument covered in the course.  Two class meetings weekly.  Two credit hours.

Vocal Pedagogy and Choral Conducting:  An exploration of the physiology/anatomy of the voice and of conducting technique as applied to the choral rehearsal.  Specific topics include the child voice, adolescent voice, and the relationship between gesture and sound.  Membership in the Chamber Choir is required during this semester.  Two credit hours.

               These courses are designed for students studying music education.  Staff

MUSIC  308  METHODS IN MUSIC EDUCATION  Music pedagogy in elementary and secondary schools.  Emphasis on managing the learning environment, curriculum design, pedagogy, and assessment.  Faculty-supervised observations in area schools required.  J. Torrenti

MUSIC  311  FOUR WORKS FROM FOUR PERIODS  A study of four major works from four historical periods:  Handel's Messiah (1742), Beethoven's Ninth Symphony (1824), Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique (1830), and Stravinsky's Sacre du printemps (1913).  The class examines each work's premiere performance and its contemporary significance, and includes score study and analysis.  Readings include First Nights by Thomas Forrest Kelly. 

               Prerequisite:  Course 223 and either 247 or 248.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  J. D. Wilson

MUSIC  320  ORCHESTRATION  Analytical and practical skills in the history and practice of compositional methods in writing for the orchestra.  Students learn about all orchestral instruments and have the opportunity to write for specific ensembles of varying sizes.

               Prerequisite:  Course 223.  M. Seto

MUSIC  321  COUNTERPOINT  Studies in contrapuntal style from the 16th and 18th centuries.  Projects in modal, and tonal styles.

               Two lectures and one ear-training session per week.  Prerequisite:  Course 223.  Staff

MUSIC  323  POST-TONAL THEORY  Theoretical and analytical study of 20th- and 21st-century music, focusing on developments in the areas of pitch, rhythm, texture, and form.  Analytical and creative projects.

               Two lectures and two ear-training sections per week.  Prerequisite:  Course 223.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  M. Thomas

MUSIC  324  JAZZ HARMONY  This is an introduction to jazz harmony and its nomenclature.  Students will study jazz chord construction, harmonic progressions, melodic construction, and musical forms.  Special emphasis will be placed on mastering harmonic exercises at the keyboard and on ear training exercises.  The course culminates in a final jazz composition/arranging project.

               Two lectures and one ear-training session per week.  Prerequisite:  Course 223 or permission of the instructor.  J.D. Wilson

MUSIC  325  CONDUCTING I  Basic techniques of instrumental conducting.  Training includes conducting one or more of the Music Department ensembles.  Two credit hours.  One class weekly.

               Prerequisite:  Course 223.  Co-requisite:  Enrollment in a relevant instrumental ensemble.  Staff

MUSIC  326  CONDUCTING II  Advanced projects in instrumental or vocal conducting.  Training includes conducting one or more of the Music Department ensembles.  Two credit hours.  One class weekly.

               Prerequisite:  Course 325.  Staff

MUSIC  331, 332  COMPOSITION I, II  Vocal and instrumental composition in small and large forms.  Instruction is available in electronic music for interested students.

               Prerequisite:  Course 323.  Offered every semester.  Staff

MUSIC  343  MUSICAL ANALYSIS  The analysis of complete tonal movements, from both a music-theoretic and musicological perspective.  Topics include form, style, motivic/thematic design, linear organization, and connections between analysis and performance.  Projects will employ both prose and graphic techniques.

               Prerequisite:  Course 223.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  M. Thomas

MUSIC  425, 426  CONDUCTING III, IV  Continuation of Course 325 and 326.  Two credit hours.  One class weekly.

               Prerequisite:  Course 326.  Staff

MUSIC  431, 432  COMPOSITION III, IV  A continuation of Courses 331 and 332.

               Prerequisite:  Course 332.  Offered every semester.  Staff

MUSIC  493  ADVANCED STUDY SEMINAR IN MUSIC  A capstone course that integrates the musicological, analytical, musicianship, and research skill students develop throughout the music curriculum into an in-depth study of a specific topic.  Topics subject to change annually.

               Open to junior and senior majors and minors, and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  Staff

MUSIC  493A  CHINESE MUSIC AND THEATER  An exploration of Chinese music and theater in the context of migration, diaspora, and globalization.  Readings in ethnomusicology, area studies, and cultural studies, including The Flower PrincessA Cantonese Opera by Tong Dik Sang, Chinese Street Opera in Singapore by Tong Soon Lee, and Beyond Exoticism by Timothy Taylor.  J. D. Wilson

 MUSIC  493B  MUSICAL NATIONALISM AND EXOTICISM  An examination of nationalistic expression and cultural difference in selected musical works from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries.  Foundational readings in political science, postcolonial studies, and musicology by Benedict Anderson, Edward Said, Richard Taruskin, and Ralph Locke, among others; repertoire will include Verdi's Aida, Bizet's Carmen, and works by Mozart, Liszt, Mussorgsky, Debussy, Stravinsky, and Ives.  M. Seto

MUSIC  493C  MUSIC AND CULTURE IN THIRD REPUBLIC FRANCE  An exploration of musical and cultural life in the French Third Republic (1870-1940).  Specific topics include the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune; the Dreyfus Affair; nationalism, exoticism, and internationalization; gender politics; and ″modernity″ and ″modernism” in their various manifestations.  Case studies of works by Bizet, Saint-Saëns, Franck, Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Les Six, and Messiaen.  M. Seto

MUSIC  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

MUSIC  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

MUSIC  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

MUSIC  497-498  HONORS STUDY

INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL INSTRUCTION

Instrumental and vocal lessons concentrate on classical technique and repertoire; instruction in jazz and/or popular styles may also be offered at the discretion of particular instructors.

               Admission to instrumental study and placement into Music 115 or 215 are determined by an audition to be given at an announced time just prior to the opening of each term.  Students who have studied in a previous year may, at the discretion of the instructor, be asked to re-audition in the fall.

               The student fee for music lessons is paid by the generous gift of the Jack Niblack ′98 Music Lessons Fund.  Students will audition for lessons with the music department.  The department will register eligible students and provide a list to the Office of the Registrar by the end of the add/delete period each semester.

INSTRUCTORS

Piano:  P. Newman, K. Ogano, I. Frenkel

Voice:  M. Ivanov, J. Svedaite-Waller, S. Talmadge

Organ:  J. Anthony

Harpsichord:  L. Skernick

String Instruments:  Bass, M. McCormick; Classical Guitar, J. McNeish; Violin and Viola, T. Arm, D. Lee; Violoncello, A. Wong; Harp, M. Sesma

Woodwind and Brass Instruments:  Bassoon, R. Noreen; Clarinet, T. Labadorf; Flute, P. Harper; Saxophone, J. Clark, J. Thomas; French Horn, J. Thorne; Oboe, L. Van Cleve; Trombone, V. Johnson; Trumpet, T. Brown; Tuba, G. Buttery

Percussion:  P. Jarvis

MUSIC  115  INTRODUCTORY INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL STUDY  Private instruction designed for students at an elementary level.  Students receive one 25-minute lesson per week.  Minimum practice expectation is one half-hour per day.  May be repeated once for credit, after which students will move into Music 215 or terminate study.  Normally, students are expected to enroll in an ensemble concurrently.

               Prerequisite or parallel:  Course 104, 122, or 131.  One semester-hour credit per semester (pass/not passed).  For restrictions on the number of one-semester-hour courses that may be counted toward the degree, see page 154.

MUSIC  118  BASIC KEYBOARD SKILLS  Private instruction designed for music majors who are not pianists, but who are preparing for the piano proficiency test.  Students receive one 25-minute lesson per week.  Minimum practice expectation is one half-hour per day.  May be repeated for credit.

Please note: this course was formerly listed as ″Ensemble D″; change effective fall 2012.  One semester-hour credit per semester (pass/not passed).  For restrictions on the number of one semester-hour courses that may be counted toward the degree, see page 154.

MUSIC  215  INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL STUDY  Private instruction designed for students at an intermediate level or higher.  Students receive one 50-minute lesson per week.  Minimum practice expectation is one hour per day.  May be repeated for credit.

               Prerequisite or parallel:  Normally, a student takes Course 131 parallel to the first semester of applied study; otherwise Course 131 must be completed by the end of the second semester of study.  In certain cases Course 104 or 122 may substitute for 131.  In addition to Course 131 students must enroll in an ensemble for at least their first four semesters of study.  Two credit hours.

MUSIC  415  ADVANCED INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL STUDY:  SENIOR RECITAL  Private instruction designed for students preparing to perform a senior recital.  Students receive two 50-minute lessons per week.  Minimum practice expectation is two hours per day.  Additional work includes preparing the recital program, writing program notes, and publicizing the recital.  May be repeated once for credit.

               Prerequisite:  Course 215 and permission of the instructor and the department chair.  Four credit hours.

ENSEMBLE GROUPS

MUSIC  220  ENSEMBLE GROUPS  One semester-hour credit per semester (pass/not passed).  For restrictions on the number of one-semester-hour courses that may be counted toward the degree, see page 154.

               The department offers opportunities in vocal and instrumental ensemble performance and training in basic skills for singers and keyboardists.  Ensembles include regular rehearsals and performances to improve students' abilities in sight-reading and ear training and to broaden their awareness of music from different historical periods and cultures.

Please note:  letter designations have changed, effective fall 2012.  Open by audition; regular attendance and practicing required.  May be repeated for credit.

A.  Chamber Choir:  The Connecticut College Chamber Choir studies and performs choral works from various historical periods.  Three rehearsals weekly.  W. Moy

B.  Chamber Music:  Chamber music ensembles perform classical repertoire.  Enrollment according to ensemble openings and level of players' experience.  One coaching session and/or two rehearsals weekly are required.  Staff

C.  Concert Band:  Rehearses and performs concert band repertoire from the standard literature.  Two rehearsals weekly.  G. Buttery

D.  Jazz Ensemble:  The Connecticut College Jazz Ensemble performs jazz repertoire covering a variety of styles and periods.  One coaching session and two rehearsals weekly are required.

               Prerequisite:  Ability to read musical notation (including jazz chord symbols) and ability to improvise.  Audition required.  G. Buttery

E.  Musical Theater Ensemble:  Rehearses and performs fully staged works from the musical theater repertoire.  Intensive rehearsal schedule in the first half of the spring semester.  By audition; spring semester only.  Section E may be taken for one or two credits.  Staff

F.  Orchestra:  The Connecticut College Orchestra rehearses and performs orchestral repertoire from the standard literature.  Two rehearsals weekly.   M. Seto

G.  Percussion and New Music Ensemble:  Rehearses and performs percussion ensemble repertoire from the standard and contemporary literature along with contemporary music written for various chamber ensembles.  Both percussionists and other performers welcome, by audition.  Weekly rehearsal.  P. Jarvis