Human Development



Professors:  Dunlap, Fredricks; Assistant Professor:  Marulis; Professor Bhatia, chair

The Major in Human Development:

The major consists of at least eleven courses, including Courses 111; 201; 204; 225; 306 or 321; two additional 300-level courses; one 400-level course; Biology 105 or Psychology 100; Mathematics 107 or 206; and one of the following: American Studies/History 201; Gender and Women′s Studies 224; Hispanic Studies 226; Psychology 203, 325, 326, 341; Sociology 223, 262; a freshman seminar taught by a faculty member in human development; or an elective at or above the 200 level that is approved by the adviser. Students should complete Biology 105 or, Mathematics 107 or 206, and Human Development 201 by the end of the sophomore year. Students who are double majors in Human Development and Psychology may use Psychology 201 to replace Mathematics 107 or 206 in the major. Students who are double majors in Human Development and Anthropology, or Psychology, or Sociology may request that Psychology 202, or Sociology 354 be substituted for Course 201.

The Minor in Human Development:

The human development department offers a minor with a specific focus on social policy affecting children and families. The minor consists of courses 103, 111, 304, and 306 or 321, and one from the following: Economics 247; Psychology 206, Sociology 223, or an elective at or above the 200 level that is approved by adviser.

Advisers:  S. Bhatia, M. Dunlap, J. Fredricks

Learning Goals in the Human Development Major

The major in Human Development offers students an in-depth investigation of how individuals grow and change within their familial, cultural, and social contexts. Human Development is an interdisciplinary major that integrates knowledge from anthropology, biology, economics, education, history, medicine, psychology, and sociology. Coursework allows students to examine and explore the impact of globalization, demographic and policy changes, racial identity, risk and resiliency, and the media. The Connecticut College Children’s Program (CCCP), an NAEYC accredited early childhood program, allows students to extend their learning outside of the classroom. All majors participate in service learning at the CCCP as well as at placements with other New London community partners (e.g., social service agencies, government agencies, and school systems).

DEEP KNOWLEDGE BASE

Students will acquire an in-depth knowledge of key theoretical perspectives and paradigms. Students will analyze and interpret data using quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Students will use multiple disciplinary perspectives to evaluate theories, concepts, readings, and experiential learning.Students will formulate clearly articulated arguments in writing and speech (e.g., oral presentations, discussions).

ANALYSIS OF DIVERSE SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXTS

Students will acquire knowledge of individual differences in the range and patterns of development across the lifespan.Students will examine the critical role that culture (including gender, race, socioeconomic status), and power relations play in shaping human development across the lifespan.

THEORETICAL AND EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Students will create intellectual linkages between classroom learning and community based experiences.

Courses

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 103 CHILDREN'S RIGHTS AND PUBLIC POLICY Selected public policies and laws that affect children′s rights, with special attention to the historical context of contemporary policies and law. Topics include divorce, child abuse, education, healthcare, and juvenile justice. This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 102.

               Enrollment limited to 35 students. Offered spring semester. J. Fredricks

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 111 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN DEVELOPMENT Sequences and patterns of growth and development throughout the life-span. All sections provide an introductory survey of human development; each section focuses on a topic as an integrative theme. Topics are subject to change annually. Community service learning is required.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students. This course satisfies General Education Area 3. S. Bhatia, M. Dunlap, J. Fredricks, Staff

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 201 OBSERVATIONAL METHODS Methods of observing children and adults in different social and cultural settings. Particular attention to the nature of ethnographic information obtained from community based field work.

               Two lectures; two laboratory hours. Enrollment limited to 30 students. Offered spring semester. This is a designated Writing course. S. Bhatia

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 202 BEST PRACTICES AND THE PRESCHOOL EXPERIENCE Supervised work at the Children′s Program during Winter Break. Students will work 15 hours, engage in reflection, and write a short paper analyzing the experience. Topics include observation, neurotypical and atypical development, language acquisition, and inclusive practice. One hour of credit, marked as passed/not passed.

               Permission of the instructor required. This course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Staff

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 204 CHILDREN IN LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS Theory and research on learning during early childhood with particular reference to the role of home, school, community and other learning environments for children, including those with diverse backgrounds and abilities.

               Two lectures; three hours of supervised work at the department Children's Program.  Prerequisite: Course 111. Enrollment limited to 30 students. Offered fall semester. This is a designated Writing course. Staff

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 225 INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN DEVELOPMENT A study of the range of and variation in patterns of development in children and youth and their familial, medical, societal, and educational consequences. Consideration of etiology, contemporary treatment, policy and intervention approaches. Community service learning at the Children′s Program is required.

               Two lectures; three hours of supervised work at the department Children′s Program.  Prerequisite: Course 204 for Human Development majors, or Education 223 for Education Certificate students. Enrollment limited to 30 students. Offered spring semester. Staff

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 302 SOCIAL AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT Theory and research in human personality and social development. Topics include attachment, altruism, aggression, issues of diversity, gender and cultural role development, and family and social influence. Community service learning is required.

               Prerequisite: One from among the following: Course 201; one 200-level course in anthropology, psychology, or sociology. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Offered fall semester. This is a designated Writing course. M. Dunlap

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 304 CHILDREN AND FAMILY SOCIAL POLICIES Child and family policies. An examination of contemporary social and legal issues which affect children and their families. This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 304.

               Prerequisite: Course 103 and one 200-level course in human development, government, psychology, or sociology. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Offered fall semester. This is a designated Writing course. J. Fredricks

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 306 LANGUAGE, NARRATIVE, AND SELF A survey of theories and research in language development emphasizing the role of narrative in socialization, especially moral development and the development of personhood. An examination of the various cultural/narrative sources that children and families from diverse backgrounds draw on when constructing moral meanings about their own and others' actions.

               Prerequisite: Any 200-level course or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Offered fall semester. This is a designated Writing course. S. Bhatia

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 307 ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT Psychological, social, cognitive, and physical aspects of adolescence and youth with emphasis on the distinctive character of personal experience during this period. Topics examined include autonomy, identity, sexuality, substance abuse, delinquency, morality, and educational and career choice. Communityservice learning with adolescents is required. This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 307.

               Prerequisite: A 200-level course in anthropology, human development, psychology, or sociology. Education 223 is required for students earning a secondary education certificate. Enrollment limited to 20 students. This is a designated Writing course. J. Fredricks, M. Dunlap

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT  314  MEDIA, SELF, AND SOCIETY This course employs a developmental perspective to study how individual′s identities are shaped by media. A life-span perspective is used to discuss how children, youth and families from diverse backgrounds interpret media narratives about violence, gender, race, body images, sexuality, and sports to construct their life-stories.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students. This is a designated Writing course. S. Bhatia

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 321 CHILDREN AND FAMILIES IN A MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY Influences such as culture, ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender, and societal inequity and racism on families and on children's growth and development; emphasis on contemporary issues related to families and children in a diverse society. Issues include child rearing, education, and media influences. Community service learning is required. This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 321.

               Prerequisite: One course in human development, anthropology, or sociology. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Offered spring semester. This is a designated Writing course. M. Dunlap

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 325 LIFE-SPAN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT An advanced level study of human life-span development. Classical and contemporary theories and research examined in original reading and critical commentary from the following fields: developmental psychology, biological psychology, cultural psychology, anthropology and sociology. Issues may include parent-child communication, bicultural families, and biological and cognitive aspects of the life-cycle.

               Prerequisite: Courses 111 and 201; Government 250. Enrollment limited to 20 students. This is a designated Writing course. S. Bhatia

Advanced Study Seminars

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 402 WHAT’S LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT?: ADVANCED SOCIAL AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH PROCESSES Engagement in research, data analysis, and presentations about perceptions and misperceptions of the social and personality behavior of an urban family in a Spike Lee movie. Of particular interest to those pursuing graduate school, social services, or teaching professions, and those interested in the complexity of diversity issues among real-life practitioners.

               Prerequisite: Course 201, 302, or 321, and one of the following: Mathematics 107, 206, Psychology 201, Sociology 354; permission of the instructor is required. Enrollment limited to 16 students. This is a designated Writing course. M. Dunlap

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 406 DEVELOPMENTAL RESEARCH IN LANGUAGE: ETHNOGRAPHY, SOCIALIZATION, AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF SELF AND IDENTITY Examination of the role that different communicative and language socialization practices play in understanding how diverse families and children co-construct meanings about self and other relationships. Supervised ethnographic observation project/research in school or in the community.

               Prerequisite: Courses 201, 306, and one of the following: Mathematics 107, 206, or Psychology 201. Enrollment limited to 16 students. This is a designated Writing course. S. Bhatia

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 408  CHILD MALTREATMENT A study of developmental trajectories resulting from childhood abuse and neglect within the family, including the intergenerational transmission of parenting ideologies. This course also explores early intervention and prevention strategies for families with high levels of maltreatment risk. Students will engage in directed research projects. This is the same as Gender and Women′s Studies 408.

               Prerequisite: Any course in statistics or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16 students. This is a designated Writing course. Staff

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 414 ADULTHOOD AND AGING: SOCIAL RESEARCH, POLICY AND PRACTICE Exploration of aspects of social research, policy and practice as applied to middle aged and older adults. Mental health and well being, psychosocial considerations, economic factors and ethical issues across the mid to later life span will be explored. Requirements will include participation in on-going research, opportunities to observe applied research and policy work, and the construction of a research proposal.

               Prerequisite: Course 325 and one of the following: Mathematics 107, 206, or Psychology 201. Enrollment limited to 16 students. This is a designated Writing course. Staff

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 415 SOCIAL POLICY ANALYSIS IN URBAN AMERICA Advanced study of contemporary public policies in Urban America. Topics include education, economic development, health care, welfare reform, child care, and parenting. Requirements include development of a research proposal on a selected topic in public policy. This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 415.

               Prerequisite: Course 201 and one 300-level Human Development course; and one of the following: Mathematics 107, 206, or Psychology 201; or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16 students. This is a designated Writing course. J. Fredricks

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 416 GLOBALIZATION, CULTURE AND IDENTITY This course focuses on how globalization impacts the development of children, youth, and families residing in Asia, Africa, Europe, and North America. The course utilizes inter-disciplinary research to explain how global media flows, social movements, terrorism, migration, and sweatshops are re-configuring the social and cultural identities and families. This is the same course as Gender and Women′s Studies 416.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16 students. This is a designated Writing course. S. Bhatia

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 291, 292 INDIVIDUAL STUDY Proposals for Individual Study are initiated by the student and take the form of directed reading or research. A student who wishes to do an Individual Study must get approval from a faculty adviser and present a formal proposal to the department in the first week of the semester in which the study is to be done. This is a designated Writing course.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 391, 392 INDIVIDUAL STUDY This is a designated Writing course.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 491, 492 INDIVIDUAL STUDY Advanced individual study options. This is a designated Writing course.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 295, 296 FIELD WORK Supervised work in a human service setting. Students will work 8-10 hours per week under the supervision of a professional within the setting and will write a term paper analyzing the experience from a theoretical perspective under the direction of a faculty member.

               Prerequisite: Course 204. Permission of the supervising faculty member; permission of the supervising agency; and approval of the department. Students anticipating enrollment should contact the supervising faculty member no later than the third week of the semester preceding the anticipated enrollment. This course may be taken for two semesters only with permission of the department.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 495, 496 FIELD WORK Advanced Field work option.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 497-498 HONORS STUDY Proposals for Honors Study must be submitted to the department in the spring of the junior year. See faculty adviser for details. This is a designated Writing course.