Government and International Relations



Professors:  Borrelli, Coats, Dawson, Frasure, Hybel, James, Patton, Rose; Associate Professor:  Tian; Assistant Professor:  Sayej; Adjunct Assistant Professor:  Nugent; Adjunct Instructor:  Melo; Visiting Assistant Professor:  Mitchell; Professor Borer, chair

The Major in Government

The major consists of ten or more semester courses, at least eight of which shall be at the 200 level or above.  Three courses must be at the 300 level or above, including a 400-level government seminar taken in the junior or senior year at Connecticut College.  Honors Study (497-498) or Individual Study (491, 492), supervised by a Connecticut College Government professor, may be taken in lieu of the 400-level seminar.  Students taking Honors Study must complete at least eleven courses in the major for graduation.  Under normal circumstances majors must take at least seven of the major courses at Connecticut College.

               Majors must include at least one semester course in each of the following four fields:

       1.     Political Theory (110, 211, 214, 304, 318, or a relevant seminar or special topic).

       2.     Comparative Politics (112, 220, 224, 225, 230, 238, 251, 263, 277, 308, 309, 322,

               or a relevant seminar or special topic).

       3.     U.S. Politics (111, 212, 221, 226, 231, 250, 258, 260, 262, 284, 304, 316, 335, 336,

               or a relevant seminar or special topic).

       4.     International Politics (113, 205, 206, 215, 220, 225, 228, 229, 252, 263, 307, 308, 316,

              324, 325, 326, 348, 352, or a relevant seminar or special topic).

Advisers:  T. Borer, M.A. Borrelli, W. J. Coats, J. Dawson, W. Frasure, A. Hybel, D. James, D. Patton, W. Rose, C. Sayej, J. Tian

The Minor in Government

A minor in government shall consist of a minimum of five courses concentrated in one of the following fields:  U.S. Politics, International Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Theory, or Public Policy.  The five or more courses may be distributed as follows:

1.     May include the 100-level introductory course in the field.  For the Public Policy Concentration, a 100-level course in any of the fields may be selected.

2.     Must include at least one 300- or 400-level course in the field during the junior or senior year.  Independent Studies (391, 392, 491, 492) may be used in lieu of the relevant advanced course or seminar.

3.     Must include at least two 200- or 300-level courses in the field, normally taken prior to enrollment in the advanced course or seminar.

4.     The fifth course must be beyond the 100 level and with the permission of the advisor may be taken in a related field.

The following concentrations are offered:

  1. U.S. Politics, drawn from the following courses:  111, 212, 221, 226, 231, 250, 258, 260, 262, 284, 304, 316, 335, 336, or a relevant seminar or special topic.

Advisers:  M. A. Borrelli, W. Frasure, D. James.

  1. International Politics, drawn from the following courses: 113, 205, 206, 215, 220, 225, 228, 229, 252, 263, 307, 308, 316, 324, 325, 326, 348, 352, or a relevant seminar or special topic.  One course from comparative politics at the 200 level or above may be included.

Advisers:  T. Borer, J. Dawson, A. Hybel, D. Patton, W. Rose, C. Sayej, J. Tian.

  1. Comparative Politics, drawn from the following courses:  112, 220, 224, 225, 230, 238, 251, 263, 277, 308, 309, 322, or a relevant seminar or special topic.  One course from international politics at the 200 level or above may be included.

Advisers:  T. Borer, J. Dawson, A. Hybel, D. Patton, C. Sayej, J. Tian.

  1. Political Theory, drawn from the following courses:  110, 211, 214, 304, 318, or a relevant seminar or special topic.

Adviser:  W. J.  Coats.

  1. Public Policy, drawn from the following courses:  110, 111, 112, 113, 215, 220, 231, 251, 252, 258, 260, 262, 263, 307, 324, 326, 336, 352, or a relevant seminar or special topic.

Advisers:  T. Borer, M. A. Borrelli, J. Dawson, W. Frasure, D. James.

Relevant 301, 302 Special Topics courses may apply toward the minor concentration.  Ordinarily, a student may apply only one course taken at another institution toward the minor concentration.

The Major in International Relations

International Relations is an interdisciplinary major administered by the Government Department.  It consists of ten or more semester courses.  At least eight must be at the 200 level or above.  Two Government courses must be at the 300 level or above, including a 400-level Government seminar taken in the junior or senior year.  Courses must be taken from the departments of Government, History, and Economics.  Six of the courses must be in government and four from related social science fields.  Students who do Honors Study (two courses) must present eleven courses in the major.  At least seven courses (eight for honors) must be taken at Connecticut College.  A government Honors Study (497-498) or an Individual Study (491, 492) may be taken in lieu of the seminar.

               Students should develop a particular focus in the major, such as foreign policy analysis, international political economy, the developing world, environmental politics, security studies, international relations theory, human rights, politics or international politics of a region, ethnic conflict, terrorism, or other approved topic.  You should develop this focus in consultation with your adviser by early in the junior year.

               In addition to the College language requirement, majors must take at least one course in a modern foreign language beyond the intermediate level.  Students taking Arabic, Chinese, or Japanese must complete the intermediate level series.  To become and remain fluent in the language, as well as to be competitive for certain graduate programs, students are encouraged to take language courses through the senior year.

               Students are also encouraged to study abroad, especially if language immersion is involved.  To gain practical experience and to make professional contacts, students are encouraged to do an internship with a governmental or non-governmental organization concerned with international affairs.

               In planning a schedule of courses, check the Catalog for prerequisites to courses.  For example, almost all of the Economics courses listed below require both Economics 111 and 112.  Courses listed here suggest the types of courses that fit the requirements.  In consultation with your adviser, some substitutions are permitted.  For instance, if taken in Germany, a course in German foreign policy taught by a politics department could meet the foreign policy requirement.

               The required Government courses are Government 113 and five others, of which at least two shall be at the 300 level or above, selected as follows:     

 1.        One in Foreign Policy selected from:  Government 206, 215, 252, 352, or an appropriate advanced course.

 2.              One in International Politics selected from:  Government 205, 206, 215, 220, 225, 228, 229, 263, 307, 308, 324, 325, 326, 348, or an appropriate advanced course.

 3.        One in Comparative Politics selected from:  Government 112, 220, 224, 225, 230, 238, 251, 263, 277, 308, 309, 322 or an appropriate advanced course.

 4.        One other 200-, 300-, or 400-level Government course in the International Politics,    Foreign Policy, or Comparative fields noted above.  Government 316, National Security vs. Personal Freedom, can also satisfy this requirement.

 5.        A Government seminar taken at Connecticut College during the junior or senior year:  400-level Government International Politics, Foreign Policy, or Comparative Politics seminar.  An alternative is Honors Study (497-498) or an Individual Study (491or 492) supervised by a Connecticut College Government professor.

Four additional, non-Government courses selected as follows:

For all departments, the following qualifier can be added:  "or appropriate advanced course."

 1.              One in Economics selected from:  208, 210, 216, 219 (formerly 319), 220, 234, 237, 311, 319, 330, or 332.

 2.              One in History selected from:  202, 216, 219, 220, 224, 226, 234, 243, 247, 249, 250, 253, 262, 264, 272, 278, 319, 324, 325, or 344.

 3.             Two additional courses selected from the following:  Any of the Economics or History courses noted above; Anthropology 234, 260, 280, 307, 315, 360, or 363; Gender and Women's Studies 224, 226, 401 (formerly 360); Philosophy 232; Religious Studies 248 or 304; or an appropriate Individual or Honors Study.

 Advisers:  T. Borer, J. Dawson, A. Hybel, D. Patton, W. Rose, C. Sayej, J. Tian

Learning Goals in the Government Major

 CONNECTICUT COLLEGE GRADUATES WITH A MAJOR IN GOVERNMENT WILL:

  •  Demonstrate a general understanding of government and politics that spans and is informed by scholarly insights from the subfields of U.S. politics, comparative politics, international relations, and political theory.  Specifically, graduates will be able to speak and write cogently about:

o       U.S. Politics.  The features of the U.S. Constitution, U.S. political culture and the governmental institutions, processes, and policies of the U.S. government;

o      Comparative Politics.  Variations in the political cultures and governmental institutions, processes, and policies of states;

o      International Relations.  Competing historical and contemporary theories and debates surrounding national sovereignty, international norms and values, and cooperation and conflict (surrounding, for example, military power, economic relations, and human rights) among states, international organizations, and nonstate actors around the world; and

o       Political Theory.  Competing theories of the origins and nature of political authority, legitimacy, and justice, reaching back to the ancient Greeks; the constitution of political societies through choices among possible institutions and processes; the relationships between governments and markets; and the tensions between collective political action and individual liberties.

  •  Demonstrate a deep understanding in some portion of the four subfields (listed above) as a result of completing upper-level coursework.
  •  Demonstrate the ability to plan, research, and write an extended paper on a topic related to their chosen area of concentration.
  •  Engage in critical thinking when confronted with competing opinions and various viewpoints.
  •  Develop skills in oral communication and public speaking through active participation in classroom discussions and presentations.

Learning Goals in the International Relations Major

CONNECTICUT COLLEGE GRADUATES WITH A MAJOR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS WILL:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of competing theories and debates surrounding national sovereignty, international norms and values, and cooperation and conflict among states, international organizations, and non-state actors around the world that is informed by coursework in the departments of Government, History, and Economics; with specific ability to speak and write cogently about each of the following:

o   Major scholarly debates within the subfield of foreign policy;

o   Major scholarly debates within the subfield of international relations;

o   Major scholarly debates within the subfield of comparative politics;

o   Major scholarly debates regarding International economic cooperation, conflict, and development; and

o   The history and culture of a particular country or region other than the United States.

  • Develop foreign language proficiency through the completion of a course in a modern foreign language beyond the intermediate level (students taking Chinese, Japanese, or Arabic must complete the intermediate-level series); and
  • Demonstrate a deep understanding of one of the following subfields of international relations: foreign policy analysis, international political economy, the developing world, environmental politics, security studies, terrorism, human rights, the politics or international politics of a particular region, ethnic conflict, international relations theory, or some other topic approved by their adviser. 
  • Demonstrate the ability to plan, research, and write an extended paper on a topic related to their chosen area of concentration.
  •  Engage in critical thinking when confronted with competing opinions and various viewpoints.
  •  Develop skills in oral communication and public speaking through active participation in classroom discussions and presentations.

 Courses

 Basic Courses

GOVERNMENT  110  POLITICAL IDEAS  An introduction to basic political concepts and institutions such as "politics," "justice," "constitution," and "revolution."  Readings from Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Madison, Tocqueville, Marx, Lenin, Weber, and others, including some modern fiction

               Not open to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 40 students per section.  Offered both semesters.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3 and is a designated Writing course.  W. J. Coats, D. James

GOVERNMENT  111  UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS  An analysis of the underlying values, processes, institutions, and issues in United States politics.

               Not open to juniors and seniors except by permission of the department.  Enrollment limited to 30 students per section.  Offered both semesters.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3.  M. A. Borrelli, W. Frasure, D. James

GOVERNMENT  112  COMPARATIVE POLITICS  Comparative political analysis with examination of politics in the Americas, Europe, Asia and Africa.  Emphasis on political concepts to examine the conditions for democratic politics, economic development and ethnic conflict.

               Not open to juniors and seniors except by permission of the department.  Enrollment limited to 30 students per section.  Offered both semesters.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3.  D. Patton, J. Tian

GOVERNMENT  113  INTERNATIONAL POLITICS  An introductory historical and theoretical analysis of modern international relations.  The course will focus primarily on understanding the patterns of international relations, especially war and peace, and economic issues.

               Not open to juniors or seniors except by permission of the department.  Enrollment limited to 30 students per section.  Offered both semesters.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3 and is a designated Writing course.  A. Hybel, W. Rose, T. Borer

Intermediate Courses

GOVERNMENT  205  INSURGENCY AND COUNTERINSURGENCY  An examination of insurgency (a variant of guerilla warfare) and counterinsurgency (the governmental response).  Drawing from political science and history, the course considers the nature, causes, and consequences of a variety of insurgencies.  It also assesses the uses and limits of various approaches to counterinsurgency.

Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course is not open to students who have received credit for Government 207 or History 207.  W. Rose

GOVERNMENT  206  U.S. FOREIGN POLICY TOWARD LATIN AMERICA  Analysis of foreign policies initiated by the United States toward Latin America from the Monroe Doctrine to the Clinton Administration.

               Open to students who have taken Course 113 or 252.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  A. Hybel

GOVERNMENT  211  ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THOUGHT  Western political theory from Plato to medieval Latin Christendom.  Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, and others.  This is the same course as Philosophy 241.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 110 or a course in philosophy.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 6 and is a designated Writing course.  W. J. Coats

GOVERNMENT  212  CONGRESS  The responsibilities and the difficulties that attend representation as it is practiced by members of the United States legislative branch.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 111.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. A. Borrelli

GOVERNMENT  214  MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT  Western political theory from Machiavelli to the late nineteenth century.  Readings from Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Nietzche.  This is the same course as Philosophy 244.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 110 or a course in philosophy.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 6 and is a designated Writing course.  W. J. Coats

GOVERNMENT  215  THE UNITED STATES AND VIETNAM  An examination of various transitional episodes in America's intercourse with Vietnam since 1945, with an emphasis on elements of U.S. politics and policymaking.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  W. Frasure

GOVERNMENT  220  THE POLITICS OF EUROPEAN INTEGRATION  This course examines the history, institutions, and politics of the European Union.  It considers alternative explanations of European integration, focusing on theories of constructivism, neofunctionalism, and liberal institutionalism.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or permission of the instructor.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Priority given to government and international relations majors.  Formerly Course 493L, 494L; cannot receive credit for both courses.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  D. Patton

GOVERNMENT  221  POLITICAL PARTIES, CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS  Analysis of changes in the U.S. political context since the 1970s that affect contemporary parties, campaigns, and elections, plus their consequences for the ability to govern.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have taken Course 111.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  D. James

GOVERNMENT  223  HUMAN RIGHTS AND MEDIA  Why does media coverage of human rights atrocities sometimes mobilize people to take action to stop them, while at other times it is met with indifference?  Do different forms of media have a greater or lesser impact on mobilization?  Examining a variety of media, this course examines the complicated relationship between mediated violence and mobilization to halt it.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  T. Borer

GOVERNMENT  224  EMERGING ECONOMIES IN ASIA AND LATIN AMERICA  An examination, using the political economy approach, of the distinctive development paths of selected countries.  An assessment of the interaction between economics and politics across different regions.  Major themes include the rise of emerging market economies, new patterns of trade and international relations, geo-strategic implications, demographic transition, migration and remittances, employment, social protection, inequality, and exclusion.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Chinese or Spanish.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  This is the same course as Economics 224.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113; and Economics 111 or 112.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Tian and M. Cruz-Saco

GOVERNMENT  224f  EMERGING ECONOMIES IN ASIA AND LATIN AMERICA  (In Chinese or Spanish)  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Chinese or Spanish.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 224f must concurrently register for Economics/Government 224.  This is the same course as Economics 224f.

GOVERNMENT  225  STATES AND MARKETS IN EAST ASIA  Intermediate course on East Asian political economy.  An introduction to the basic political and economic institutions of major East Asian countries and an examination of the dynamics of the interactions between the two.  Students will develop a general set of tools that can be used to analyze contemporary issues in East Asia.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Chinese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113; or Economics 111 or 112; or an introductory course in East Asian history, languages, and cultures.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Tian

GOVERNMENT  225f  STATES AND MARKETS IN EAST ASIA  (In Chinese)  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Chinese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 225f must concurrently register for Government 225.  J. Tian

GOVERNMENT  226  POLITICAL ECONOMY OF AMERICAN BUSINESS  An examination of business in the politics and economy of the United States.  Topics include the nature of business structures, government regulation of business, the impact of business on U.S. politics and public policy, economic development, and globalization.  Emphasis on particular industries, such as transportation, energy, agriculture.  This course meets concurrently with Economics 226, with a maximum enrollment of 20 students per course; students may not receive credit for both courses.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, with preference given to sophomores.  Enrollment limited to 20 students.  W. Frasure and D. Peppard

GOVERNMENT  227  THE COLD WAR  An examination of the Cold War from several perspectives, including international relations theory, European and American politics and culture, military doctrines, geostrategy, and ideological competition.  Topics include origins of the Cold War, nuclear deterrence, decolonization and the Third World, détente, and the Cold War's end and aftermath.

                Enrollment limited to 30 students.  W. Frasure, D. Patton

Government  228  Terrorism  An investigation of four aspects of terrorism:  its characteristics, consequences, and causes, as well as methods to control its occurrence and effects.  International and domestic terrorism will be examined, along with both state-sponsored and non-state-sponsored terrorism.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  W. Rose

GOVERNMENT  229  UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING  Critical analysis of traditional missions to keep or restore peace between countries, and new humanitarian and "peace-building" operations within countries.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  W. Rose

GOVERNMENT  230  HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOUTH AFRICAN POLITICS  An analysis of the political economy of the apartheid system, as well as the consequences of this system for post-apartheid politics.  Emphasis is placed on human rights issues including the Truth Commission, race relations, and the AIDS epidemic.

               Enrollment limited to 30 students.  T. Borer

GOVERNMENT  231  POLITICS OF THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCESS  This course considers the role of politics in the administration of criminal justice in the United States by focusing upon the steps and actors in that process.  Two assumptions underlie this consideration:  1) the judicial process is best understood when considered as a subsystem of the larger political system, and 2) political considerations, defined broadly, largely explain how individuals fare within that system.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 111.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  R. Harrall

GOVERNMENT  235  COMPARATIVE PUBLIC POLICY  An examination of social policy and policy-making undertaken from a comparative perspective.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have completed one 100-level government course.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

GOVERNMENT  238  MIDDLE EAST POLITICS  Comparative analysis of political systems and structures of governance in the Middle East.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have taken Course 112; and to others with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  C. Sayej

GOVERNMENT  240  REVOLUTIONS AND REGIME TRANSITIONS:  DOMESTIC IMPLICATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONS  An examination of international and comparative theories of revolution and related processes, such as regime transitions.  Students will become familiar with several cases of revolution around the world, including the U.S.S.R., Cuba, Nicaragua, Iran, Portugal, the Eastern Bloc, and the Arab Spring, among others.  The course explores the causes of insurgency, the nature of provisional governments, the role of international actors and interventions, and the outcomes of revolutionary processes.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken Course 112 or 113.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 3.  D. Melo

GOVERNMENT  241  THE COURTS AND THE LAW  An exploration of the role played by the judicial and legal system in defining, interpreting, and enforcing law in the United States.

                Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken course 111.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  P. Mitchell

GOVERNMENT  250  GENDER AND U.S. POLITICS  How political institutions have constructed gender and thus determined lives.  Particular emphasis is given to the diversity of experiences that are claimed by people as gendered persons and to their differing political expectations and hopes.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken Course 111.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course is not open to students who have received credit for Government/Gender and Women's Studies 313.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. A. Borrelli

GOVERNMENT  251  ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISM AND ITS POLITICAL IMPACT AROUND THE GLOBE  The emergence and development of environmental activism in industrialized societies and its impact on the policy-process.  Brief review of the major environmental philosophies that have shaped environmental movements and politics around the globe; focus on comparing the characteristics and impact of popular environmental movements in advanced industrialized democracies and communist/post-communist societies.  Comparison of experiences of the United States, Western Europe, and Japan with those of the former Soviet Union, East-Central Europe, and China.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies/Slavic Studies 251.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken Environmental Studies 110 or 111 or Course 112 or 113.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Dawson

GOVERNMENT  252  U.S. FOREIGN POLICY  The international and domestic sources of foreign policy, U.S. diplomatic history, and America's role in the twenty-first century.

               Prerequisite:  Course 113.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  W. Rose

GOVERNMENT  253  CHALLENGES TO DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE′S MEDITERRANEAN REGION  Today, Italy, along with several of its Mediterranean counterparts, faces burdensome challenges in the political, social, and economic arenas.  To develop a clearer understanding of these challenges, the course is divided into two sections.  In the first, discussions focus on alternative theories that address the creation and solidification of democratic regimes.  In the second, an attempt is made to gauge the explanatory value of the competing theoretical arguments to five European states:  Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece, and Turkey.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  This course is taught in the SATA Perugia program.  A. Hybel

GOVERNMENT  258  U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND POLITICS  An examination of decision- and policy-making relating to environmental issues in the United States, from the 1930s to the present.  Issues to be addressed include natural and cultural resource management, the recreation industry, conservation and preservation debates, federalism, and the immediate future of the environmental movement.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 258.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to freshmen with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  M.A. Borrelli

GOVERNMENT  260  PROBLEMS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND LAW  An examination of political and legal problems associated with attempts to devise and implement public policy with respect to environmental quality.  Topics include the political behavior of public and private interest groups, businesses and government agencies which are saliently concerned with environmental problems.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 260.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have taken a course in government or economics.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  W. Frasure

GOVERNMENT  263  THE INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE  Starting with the science and projected impacts, we will consider climate change:  the impact on the global south and adaptation measures; the projected flood of climate refugees and their legal status; food and agriculture implications; comparative policy responses; international treaty efforts and existing international law; potential for intensification of violent conflict; and the role of activism in promoting governmental action.  While the course is interdisciplinary, there is a dominant focus on comparative policy responses and international politics.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 263.

               Prerequisite:  One course in Government or Environmental Studies; or with permission of the instructor.  This is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Dawson

GOVERNMENT  266  POLITICS OF PUERTO RICO  An examination of the development of politics in Puerto Rico from the late 19th century to the present, with some consideration of the Puerto Rican diaspora.

               Prerequisite:  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors; and to others who have taken Course 111 or 112.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

GOVERNMENT  270  THE POLITICS OF INEQUALITY  An examination of the political and governmental sources of inequality, its consequences, and various responses to it.  Analyses of race, gender, and class are included.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have completed one 100-level government course.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  Staff

GOVERNMENT  277  EUROPEAN POLITICS  Comparative analysis of political systems and structures of governance in Europe.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 112.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  D. Patton

GOVERNMENT  284  POLITICS OF BUREAUCRACY  The impact of bureaucratic structures upon the policy of the United States.  How the ideas that agencies are intended to implement are translated into political structures; constraints imposed on these structures by elected politicians; and kinds of discretion available to the bureaucrat.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 111.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. A. Borrelli

Advanced Courses

GOVERNMENT  301, 302  SPECIAL TOPICS  The study of a current, particularly relevant or special topic in politics and government.  Each topic will be offered one semester only.

 GOVERNMENT  301K, 302K  U.S. LEGAL VALUES IN CONFLICT  Judicial decisions are based, in part, on legal theories that often conflict.  Through reading and discussing relevant theories and judicial decisions, this course enables students to understand those conflicting legal values, to develop their individual judgments about them, and to decide where to set the balance when they conflict.

     Open to juniors and seniors who have taken any course in U.S. government/politics or in political theory.  This is a designated Writing course.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  D. James

GOVERNMENT  304  AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT  Analysis of the basis and consequences of American emphasis on individualism, the shift since the 1970s to hyper-individualism, and contemporary critiques of American political thought.

               Open to juniors and seniors who have taken any course in U.S. government/politics or in political theory, and to sophomores with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  D. James

GOVERNMENT  307  THE POLITICS OF REFUGEES  Issues surrounding the politics of refugees, including such topics as refugees in international law, refugees versus internally displaced peoples (IFPs), refugees and violence, humanitarian intervention, and gender based refugee issues.

               Prerequisite:  Course 113 or permission of the instructor.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  T. Borer

GOVERNMENT  308  ETHNIC CONFLICT IN EUROPE  A review of theoretical perspectives on the causes of ethnic conflict and the application of these perspectives to important cases of ethnic conflict in contemporary Europe.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 112 and any 200-level government course.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  D. Patton

GOVERNMENT  309  CHINESE POLITICS  Perspectives on contemporary Chinese governmental structure, ongoing economic reform, and the dynamics and consequences of state-society relations.  Discussion topics include reform and development strategy, democratization, urbanization, the increasing urban-rural divide, the growing gap between regions, and environmental issues.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Chinese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Tian

GOVERNMENT 309f CHINESE POLITICS (In Chinese) This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Chinese. Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking. Students electing Course 309f must concurrently register for Government 309.

GOVERNMENT  316  NATIONAL SECURITY VS PERSONAL FREEDOM  To understand the complexity of balancing national security and personal freedom the course analyzes:  conflicting values in American political thought; patterns of political choices in times of national crisis; terrorism as a new type of assault on national security and civil liberties; what happened on 9/11; why; and the U.S. response.

               Open to juniors and seniors who have taken one course in U.S. government/politics or international relations.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  D. James

GOVERNMENT  318  LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC THOUGHT  A study of the theory and practice of liberal democracy from de Tocqueville and J.S. Mill to the present, including views of its critics to the left and right.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 110 and any 200-level government course.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  W. J. Coats

GOVERNMENT  322  DEMOCRACY IN LATIN AMERICA  Latin America is a diverse and complex region that defies stereotypes and generalizations.  The goal of this course is to reach beyond the current headlines in order to capture the struggles engaged in by Latin American countries that have sought to develop democracies.  This course may include an optional section that will regularly meet with the professor outside of class to discuss supplemental texts in Spanish.  Students participating in the section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 112 and any 200-level government course.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Hybel

GOVERNMENT  322f  DEMOCRACY IN LATIN AMERICA (In Spanish)  This optional section will regularly meet with the professor outside of class to discuss supplemental texts in Spanish.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 322f must concurrently register for Government 322.  A. Hybel

GOVERNMENT  324  HUMAN RIGHTS IN WORLD POLITICS  An examination of issues surrounding the politics of human rights, and addressing such questions as the conflict between sovereignty and human rights; whether human rights are universal; human rights and foreign policy; and approaches to protecting and promoting human rights in the international arena.

               Prerequisite:  Course 113 or permission of the instructor.  Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  T. Borer

GOVERNMENT  325  INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE EAST  A study of Middle East politics within the context of theories on international relations.  Topics include regional wars, Arab-Israeli conflict, the politics of oil, and political Islam.  Special attention given to the interaction between the Middle East and the United States.

               Prerequisite:  Course 113.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  C. Sayej

GOVERNMENT  326  INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL COOPERATION  Consideration of various factors and explanations for the successes and failures in attempting to solve international and transboundary environmental problems.  In evaluating past lessons and future prospects for improved environmental protection at the global level, attention is given to the actions of states, transnational non-governmental organizations, and other actors.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 326.

               Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have taken Course 112 or 113 and any 200- or 300-level course in government or Environmental Studies.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  J. Dawson

Government  332  philosophy, politics, and the human condition  This is the same course as Philosophy 440L.  Refer to the Philosophy listing for a course description.

GOVERNMENT  333  INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY:  EUROPEAN VERSUS AMERICAN PERSPECTIVE  An examination of the principal theories of international relations relied on by scholars to explain critical international issues.  Emphasis is placed on how differently American and European scholars view international relations and their rationale for doing so.

               Prerequisite:  Course 113.  Open to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This course is taught in the SATA Perugia program.  A. Hybel

GOVERNMENT  335  CONSTITUTIONAL LAW:  POWERS AND INSTITUTIONS OF GOVERNMENT  Emphasis on Federalism and Separation of Powers:  legislative, executive and judicial.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 111 and any 200-level government course.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  W. Frasure

GOVERNMENT  336  CONSTITUTIONAL LAW:  CIVIL LIBERTIES  Analysis of continuity and change in U.S. Supreme Court interpretations of the Bill of Rights and Fourteenth Amendment.  Students brief court cases as part of their analysis of the development of the law and the U.S. Supreme Court's function as both a judicial and political institution.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores with permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  D. James

GOVERNMENT  337  COMPARATIVE SOCIAL MOVEMENTS:  PROTEST, ACTIVISM AND POLITICAL CHANGE  An examination of social movements across the globe from the perspective of comparative politics.  The course investigates the consequences of social movements for societies and governments, considering whether and how mass mobilization redistributes power and resources in authoritarian, democratic, and revolutionary contexts.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  D. Melo

GOVERNMENT  340  INTERNATIONAL ORGINAZATIONS  An exploration of the development of and the role played by formal and informal international organizations in regulating relations between states and the creation of regimes addressing transnational threats.

               Prerequisite:  Course 113.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  P. Mitchell

GOVERNMENT  346  INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW  An examination of the laws established by states to regulate their relations during peace and war, focusing on the law governing international and interstate armed conflicts.

               Prerequisite:  Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken course 113.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  P. Mitchell

GOVERNMENT  348  INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY  An analysis of how political actors create and alter the rules, norms and institutions that govern the conduct of international trade and finance, and how these rules, norms and organizations influence the global distribution of wealth and the course of economic development.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Chinese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to sophomores who have taken Course 112 or 113.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Tian

GOVERNMENT  348f  INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY  (In Chinese)  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Chinese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 348f  must concurrently register for Government 348.

GOVERNMENT  352  ALTERNATIVE PERSPECTIVES ON U.S. FOREIGN POLICY  The principal objective in this course is to develop an understanding, by means of four different theoretical models, of the various ways the United States sought to become the world system's most powerful entity and to shape its general structure.  Following a three-week discussion of the four models, we will apply them to a wide range of cases beginning with the United States' territorial expansion during the first half of the 19th century and ending with an analysis of the Bush Administration's response to the September 11, 2001 events.

               Prerequisite:  Course 113.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Hybel

GOVERNMENT  353  THE EUROPEAN UNION AS A TRANSNATIONAL ACTOR  An assessment of the role of the European Union as an institution that affects politics within and across states, sometimes reinforcing and sometimes lessening national sovereignty.

               Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  D. Melo

GOVERNMENT  358  ANALYSIS OF U.S. PUBLIC POLICY  An in-depth examination of the U.S. policymaking process with an emphasis on the theories, analytical frameworks, and tools for evaluating policy outcomes.  Students will examine numerous case studies of attempts by governments to solve public problems, asking in each case "Which approaches work best?  Where?  Why?  How do we know?"

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others who have taken Course 111.  Enrollment limited to 30 students.  J. Nugent

GOVERNMENT  396  INTERNSHIP IN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS  A research course for students who are completing or have completed an approved internship in government and politics and who seek academic credit derived from the experience.  This course does not fulfill the advanced course requirements for the Government or International Relations majors.

               Offered fall and spring semesters.  Limited to junior and senior government and international relations majors.  Students must have a minimum of a B average in government courses.

GOVERNMENT  400f   EMERGING MARKET ECONOMIES:  BRICS  (In Chinese)  This optional section will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental texts in Chinese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  Students electing Course 400f must concurrently register for Government 493E, 494E/Slavic Studies 448.

GOVERNMENT  493, 494  ADVANCED STUDY SEMINARS

               Open to juniors and seniors.  Enrollment in each seminar limited to 16 students.

 A.     CULTURE, POLITICS, AND THE ENVIRONMENT  An examination of the impact of culture on environmental policy-making.  An exploration of the ways in which present-day decisions about environmental policy have been reflective of cultural presumptions (whose culture?) about the environment, human settlement and economic development, and social values and power.  Classes focus on such diverse issues as water resources, cultural resources, nuclear waste storage, and urban development and suburban sprawl.  This is the same course as American Studies 493A, 494A/Environmental Studies 493G, 494G.

Previous study in United States government and/or history is required.  This is a designated Writing course.  M. A. Borrelli

B.     COUNTERING TERRORISM AND INSURGENCIES  An examination of the causes and cures for terrorism and insurgencies.  Through their own research, students will engage in the creation of new knowledge about these topics.

Prerequisite:  Course 113.  This is a designated Writing course.  W. Rose

 D.   POLITICAL INQUIRY:  SCOPE AND METHODS  A survey of research methods in political science, emphasizing both qualitative and quantitative methods.  Statistical software is used for the quantitative component of the course.

        Open to junior and senior majors in government or international relations.  Prerequisite:  Course 111, 112, or 113; and any 200- or 300-level course in government.  This is a designated Writing course.  C. Sayej

 E.   EMERGING MARKET ECONOMIES:  BRICs  An examination of the rapid development of four of the most important emerging market economies in the world today:  Brazil, Russia, India, and China.  The framework of comparative political economy is used to analyze the sources of economic growth of these countries, challenges facing them, and long-term implications.  This course may include an optional section that will meet for an additional hour each week to discuss supplemental readings in Chinese.  Students participating in the foreign language section will receive one additional credit hour, pass/not passed marking.  This is the same course as Slavic Studies 448.

        Prerequisite:  An introductory course in government, economics, East/South Asian, Slavic, or Latin American studies.  J. Tian

F.  THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS  An examination of the principal theories of international relations relied on by scholars to explain critical international issues.

         Prerequisite:  Course 113.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Hybel

 G.   ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS  Examination of various environmental issues in the context of principal avenues of international politics:  treaties and negotiations, international organizations, law, trade, diplomacy, force, and supra-national acculturation.  For the SATA Vietnam program, the seminar will emphasize issues germane to Vietnam.  W. Frasure

 I.     UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT:  LEGAL OR POLITICAL INSTITUTION  The U.S. Supreme Court is intensely and simultaneously both a legal and a political institution, yet its decision-making processes are the least transparent of all U.S. government institutions.  This course develops insights into the implications of the conflict between legal and political roles for the Court as an institution, the broader legal system, and the individual justices.  Through scholarly analysis, judicial biographies, and judicial writing that spans two centuries from the Marshall to the Roberts Court, students develop their own legal and judicial philosophies.

Open to senior and junior Government majors who have taken 111 or equivalent and one of the following courses: 231, 335, 336 or 301K.  This is a designated Writing course.  D. James

J.      ROUSSEAU  Rousseau′s thought is critical of the ″bourgeois″ whom he sees as torn between private interests and political duties.  Rousseau proposes an alternative to approximate in political life the unity of nature which existed before it.  His proposal involves the education of a ″new man″ who will overcome the psychological divisions of the ″bourgeois,″ and an account of political principles to receive him, as well as an account of the ″new woman″ who will receive him.  This course will involve a detailed reading and examination of this new education in order to determine to what degree the whole project is coherent.  We will start with the Discourses; then turn to Emile; and finish with the Social Contract and the Reveries.

This is a designated Writing course.  W. Coats

 L.   GRAND STRATEGY, ANCIENT AND MODERN  A theoretical and practical study of the comprehensive ways - diplomatic, military, economic, cultural - in which civilizations and states advance their values and interests in the world vis-à-vis other civilizations and states.  Readings range from classic texts such as those of Sun Tzu and Thucydides to modern case studies and secondary literature.  A major course emphasis is to encourage a holistic approach to the subject matter and to engage broad questions of why and how civilizations and states wax and wane.  This is the same course as Classics 380.

This is a designated Writing course.  W.J. Coats and E. Adler

 N.     FACTION AND COALITION IN AMERICAN POLITICS  An examination of the kinds of interests that influence people′s political choices and an attempt to understand why those interests align in particular ways for the pursuit of practical political advantage.  How is it, for example, that the familiar postures of ″pro-choice″ and ″pro-life″ have become firmly identifiable with, respectively, the Democratic and Republican parties.  W. Frasure

 P.      STATESMANSHIP  This is a designated Writing course.

 Q.     WOMEN AND WORLD POLITICS  This course examines the reasons for and the impact of global power inequality on women, and covers several silent political issues including women and war, women and violence, women and human rights, and women in the international political economy.

This is a designated Writing course.  T. Borer

R.   INTERNATIONAL ISSUES IN U.S. POLITICS  This seminar examines the importance within U.S. partisan politics of a range of issues that engage the international community, including trade, environment, immigration, and human rights.  W. Frasure

T.    THE GREENS IN EUROPE AND BEYOND  An examination of Green parties in advanced industrial societies, with an emphasis on the Greens of Western Europe.  The course also considers the Greens at the level of the European Union (EU), while covering EU environmental regulations and guidelines.  This is the same course as Environmental Studies 493T, 494T/German Studies 402.  D. Patton

 U.   ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

 V.   NATIONAL DIVERSITY AND GLOBAL CAPITALISM

 W.  REBELS, ROGUES, AND REVOLUTIONARIES:  SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND THE  POLITICS OF PROTEST  A study of social movements engaging relevant theoretical debates while learning about specific movements in the U.S. and the rest of the world.  The course focuses on questions, such as:  How and why do social movements emerge?  Where do tactics and strategies come from?  How do movements affect political change?  D. Melo

 X.     GERMANY:  PROBLEM OR MODEL  An examination of the rise of German economic and political power since 1871 and its implications for Germany, Europe, and the world.  This course focuses on German politics after the Berlin Wall with special attention to German political economy, the integration of immigrants, relations between eastern and western Germany, and German foreign policy.  D. Patton

Y.   THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY  Analysis of the contemporary presidency in a rapidly changing political system.  The course considers the President′s role as defined by the U.S. Constitution and interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court; the challenge of transition from campaigning to governing; the pressures to ″go public″ rather than negotiate with Congress; of being Chief Administrator of the massive Executive branch; of being expected to maintain economic stability and growth without most of the necessary tools to do that; and of being Commander-in-Chief and Chief of State of a nation that is the current world hegemon in a rapidly changing international environment.  While previous presidents are considered where relevant, the course focuses on analysis of recent presidencies.  

        Open to senior and junior Government majors who have taken 111 or equivalent and any   200 or 300 level course in U.S. government/politics.  This is a designated Writing course.  D. James

          Z.  THE IRAQ WAR:  CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES  An examination of the U.S.  invasion of Iraq and its aftermath.  The Iraq war raises important questions about the shape of international relations.  It has called into question the entire structure of post-war relations among sovereign states, raised issues about domestic U.S. politics, and contributed to a rethinking of America as a superpower.

        Prerequisite:  Course 112 or 113 and any 200- or 300-level course in the major.  This course is not open to students who have received credit for Government 320.  C. Sayej

GOVERNMENT  291, 292  INDIVIDUAL STUDY  Individual Study may take the form of research and writing or directed reading.  A student who wishes to do Individual Study must present a formal proposal for approval the semester before the Individual Study is to be done.  See department chair for details.

GOVERNMENT  391, 392  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

GOVERNMENT  491, 492  INDIVIDUAL STUDY

GOVERNMENT  497-498  HONORS STUDY  Honors students must complete at least ten courses in the Government major, or eleven courses in the IR major.  Proposals for Honors Study must be submitted in the spring of the junior years.  See W. Rose for details.