Art



Professors:  McDowell, Wollensak; Associate Professors:  Hendrickson, Marks, Pelletier; Assistant Professors:  Assor, Barnard; Associate Professor Bailey, chair

The department of art offers a wide variety of studio disciplines designed to provide instruction in a liberal arts context.  These courses promote and provide methods for students to communicate ideas in visual form.  The department provides students with a broad knowledge of theory and technique, allowing for creative and intellectual development in exciting and diverse media incorporating traditional tools and methods and computer applications and new technologies.

The Major in Art

The major consists of a minimum of thirteen courses, ten in art and three in art history.  The ten art courses must be chosen to satisfy the following requirements:

1.            One art course at the 100 level.

2.            Course 205.

3.            One course in three-dimensional work, as designated by the department.

4.            One course incorporating digital media, as designated by the department.

5.            Course 349, which students are advised to take during the fall semester of the senior year.

6.            Two semesters of the senior studio (Courses 449 and 450).

7.            Three additional studio art courses.

The following art history courses are recommended:  Art History 101 (formerly 121), 102 (formerly 122), 260 (formerly 231), 261; any anthropology course cross-listed with art history; any museum studies course; and any non-studio architectural studies course.  Students may, with permission of the Art Department, replace one of the three required art history courses with an appropriate substitute taught by another department.

               Students wishing to major in art should submit a portfolio for departmental review while enrolled in their fifth or sixth art course.  Prospective art majors should satisfy the following interim requirements:  two courses by the end of the freshman year; five by the end of the sophomore year; and nine by the end of the junior year.  Students may take art courses at any level, subject to completion of prerequisites and availability of space.

               Senior art majors are required to present a Thesis Exhibition of their work in their area(s) of concentration.  Students must provide photographic or video documentation of the Senior Thesis Exhibition for the departmental collection.

               Some courses in studio art and in art history are not offered every semester.  Students should plan ahead with their major adviser to assure availability of required courses.  Students wishing to study abroad are strongly encouraged to do so during the fall semester of their junior year.

Advisers:  N. Nassor, G. Bailey, C. Barnard, T. Hendrickson, P. Marks, T. McDowell, D. Pelletier, A. Wollensak

The Minor in Art

The minor consists of a minimum of seven courses, six in studio art and must include at least one 100-level course, one drawing course, two additional courses at Level Two, one 300-level course, and one additional studio elective.  A declaration of an art minor and a selection of an art department adviser should be made no later than the end of the first semester of the senior year.  Art History 102 (formerly 122) or a similar art history course chosen with the approval of the Art Department is required.  In addition, minors must participate in the annual Art Department Student Exhibition in their senior year.  Approval of all works for this exhibition must be secured from the minor adviser.  In addition, senior minors are strongly advised to attend all departmental lectures and events.

Learning Goals in the Art Major

STUDIO ART DEPARTMENT PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

The Studio Art program offers a wide variety of studio disciplines designed to provide instruction in a liberal arts context.  These courses promote and provide methods for students to communicate ideas in visual form.  The department provides students with a broad knowledge of theory and technique, allowing for creative and intellectual development in exciting and diverse media incorporating traditional tools and methods as well as state of the art software and technology.  A Studio Art major can lead to an embrace of visual culture as part of a meaningful life and a professional career in the field of visual arts.

STUDIO ART PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students are expected to engage fully within the Studio Art Program and the opportunities presented for learning.  Having completed a B. A. in Studio Art, graduates of this program will:

Visual Literacy and Communication.  Develop a high level of visual literacy allowing students to situate contemporary visual practices in a proper historical context and grounded in a foundation of visual expression.

Creative Thinking.  Creatively solve problems through the successful integration of knowledge and experience towards the creation of an original body of work.

Technical Skills and Professional Development.  Acquire the knowledge of technical skills and basic processes in a variety of media including two-dimensions, three-dimensions and time-based works.  Use professional standards to develop and present works of art and understand the discipline, rigor, initiative and passion required to sustain studio practice.

Critical Skills.  Be able to analyze visual art, verbally and in writing, both past and present, in terms of formal and technical qualities as well as their relevance to society through informed discourse.

The Curriculum

The Studio Art department at Connecticut College provides a framework for the study of visual expression.  This is done through the creation and analysis of images and objects.  Our program is based in studio practice fostering student and teacher interaction in creative and reflective processes.  Within the various media offered for study, both majors and non-majors learn the process of art making, from conceptual and perceptual skills to the techniques of production and evaluative critique.  It is the belief of the faculty that this engagement is of vital importance to all students.  In our increasingly visual culture, visual literacy has become a necessity.  In addition, the challenges of learning to master difficult techniques, participation in the process of critique, the development of creative problem solving skills, and objective self-assessment are of broad value to all liberal arts students.

Courses

STUDIO PRACTICE  In addition to regularly scheduled classes, it is expected that art students spend significant time doing studio work on assignments and in perfecting their ideas and craft.  Your teacher will indicate expectations at the start of the semester.  Cummings Art Center is widely available for this extra work anytime classes are not in session during the week, evenings, and on weekends.  Students are expected to follow proper studio etiquette and respect facilities and equipment.  The interaction of students outside of class, sharing ideas, and solutions to problems is valuable and encouraged by the department.  Senior majors are provided a workspace for the development of their thesis exhibition.  The department schedules special events such as visiting artists, films, and critiques on Wednesdays and all students are advised to make special note of these activities.

Level One:  Foundations

Introductory courses offer the beginning student experience in a variety of media and subject matter.  The sequence of foundation courses is designed to develop fundamental studio skills and an understanding of visual thought process.  Course content will include demonstrations and critique sessions and equally important, the manipulation of a variety of materials.  Course content and approach will differ from section to section or class to class, but in each the common goal is to introduce students to the ideas, techniques, and vocabularies of producing visual art.

ART  101  CONCEPTS IN TWO DIMENSIONS  The development of visual thinking through a series of exercises and projects, which includes the picture plane, spatial relationships, line, value, volume, composition, and color.

               Open to freshmen and sophomores, and to others with permission of the department.  Enrollment limited to 18 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  Staff

ART  102  CONCEPTS IN THREE DIMENSIONS  The basic principles of visual art in theory and practice.  Introductory work in drawing with an emphasis on three-dimensional design and construction.

               Open to freshmen and sophomores, and to others with permission of the department.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  G. Bailey, D. Pelletier

ART  103  CONCEPTS IN DIGITAL PROCESS:  DESIGN  A studio introduction to principles of design and visual language including typography and image.  Students are encouraged to develop their verbal and visual vocabulary through form, organization, and narrative content using traditional and digital tools.  Topics will include community, flexibility, and modularity.

               Open to freshmen and sophomores, and to others with permission of the department.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  A. Wollensak

ART  104  CONCEPTS IN TIME-BASED DIGITAL ART  An introduction to screen/time/code-based art media, from sound art to experimental film and video art to live/interactive art.  Students learn fundamental principles and techniques of time-based art making: sound recording and editing, moving image production and editing, digital mash-ups, glitches and errors as an artistic medium, and basic interactive audiovisual manipulation.  Students will consider the relationship between these techniques and practices such as painting and drawing, performance, installation, and conceptual art and sculpture, as well as the history of art and technology in the last century.  This is the same course as Arts and Technology 104.

               Open to freshmen and sophomores, and to others with permission of the department.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Students may not receive credit for this course and Art 103.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  N. Assor

Level Two:  Practice and Application

Level two courses offer students exposure to a range of techniques and an opportunity to build skills in specific media areas.  Students begin a development of personal approaches to subject matter, visual literacy, historical perspectives, critical thinking, and problem solving.

ART  200  PHOTOGRAPHY I  An introduction to the art of photography through traditional film and darkroom methods.  Emphasis is placed on controlling the technical aspects of the medium as a function of individual expression and exploring different modes of subject/photographer interactions.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 18 students who must provide film camera and supplies.  Offered both semesters.  This course satisfies General Education Area 5.  T. Hendrickson

ART  202  PRINT WORKSHOP:  INTAGLIO PROCESSES  Basic instruction in solar plate etching, engraving, and collagraph methods, including various monoprint techniques.

               Six hours beyond course work required per week.  Prerequisite:  Courses 101 and 205.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  T. McDowell

ART  204  PRINT WORKSHOP:  RELIEF PROCESSES  Basic instruction in lithography, woodblock, and relief printing techniques.

               Six hours beyond course work required per week.  Prerequisite:  Courses 101 and 205.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  T. McDowell

ART  205  DRAWING FUNDAMENTALS  Through various drawing mediums, this course addresses principles of design and composition, and builds skills in perception, visual thinking, problem solving, and creativity.  Drawing from observation, conceptual research, and manipulation of visual elements are integrated into this course.  This course is suitable for beginners and students with some experience.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course or permission of the instructorEnrollment limited to 16 students.  T. McDowell, P. Marks

ART  206  3-D FUNDAMENTALS:  REDUCTIVE/CONSTRUCTIVE TECHNIQUES  This course introduces the student to basic materials and techniques including found object.  As an extension to 102 this course focuses more attention on skills and conceptual development while introducing the student to sculpture as an art practice.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  G. Bailey

ART  207  DESIGN:  TYPE AND IMAGE  Basic instruction in principles and language of 2-dimensional design.  Emphasis on analysis, organization, and invention of form for the purpose of communicating information and concepts.  Macintosh computer applications and other means of graphic representation are explored.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course (103 preferred) or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  A. Wollensak

ART  208  DESIGN:  OBJECT AND ENVIRONMENT  Basic instruction in principles and languages of 3-dimensional design including objects for use, book arts, and environmental design.  Emphasis on analysis, organization, and invention of form for the purpose of communicating information and concepts.  Macintosh computer applications and other means of graphic representation are explored.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course (103 preferred) or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  A. Wollensak

ART  210  COLOR STUDIES:  THEORY AND APPLICATIONS  The investigation of color properties, systems, harmonies, interactions, relativity, and spatial manipulation.  Craft, composition, and expressive use of color are emphasized.  Course work includes color exercises in cut paper, computer, and paint.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  P. Marks

ART  211  PAINTING:  SPATIAL INVESTIGATIONS  Basic instruction in painting methods and materials.  Emphasis on composition, color, personal expression, and manipulation of pictorial space.

               Prerequisite:  Course 205.  Course 210 is recommended.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  P. Marks

ART  212  INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING  Introduction to traditional and contemporary approaches to painting.  Emphasis on the development of technical skills and contextual understanding of painting’s histories and contemporary manifestations.

               Six hours studio work, with instructor present for one-on-one assistance and group feedback.  Prerequisite:  Course 205 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  C. Barnard

ART  213  SOUND ART  An exploration of sound and the aural world as a tangible medium for art-making, including mobile and locative audio, interactive sound installation, sound sculpture and installation, instrument building and hacking, broadcast narratives, and live performance projects.  Topics include acoustic ecology, circuit bending, and radio transmissions.  This is the same course as Arts and Technology 213.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  N. Assor

ART  214  VIDEO INSTALLATION  An examination of the intersection of video art, sculpture, architecture, and live experience, focusing on video installations that exist within non-gallery settings.  Screenings, readings, and class projects deal with issues of body, memory, identity, home, and place.  Students utilize video production and editing techniques, sound and lighting equipment, post-production software, effective project planning, and unorthodox video projection techniques including integration with sculptural and built environments.  This is the same course as Arts and Technology 214.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  N. Assor

ART  217  CERAMIC SCULPTURE:  VESSEL CONSTRUCTIONS  An examination of the vessel form as a cultural, historical and contemporary idea.  Projects will introduce a range of tools, processes, and building methods (including the potter’s wheel) and skills associated with preparing, glazing, and firing clay.  Development of visual/tactile vocabulary in the context of critical inquiry.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course.  Enrollment limited to 8 students.  D. Pelletier

ART  218  CERAMIC SCULPTURE:  OBJECT AS IDEA  This course introduces students to thinking and working three dimensionally with clay.  A variety of building, glazing, and firing techniques will be explored in projects that encourage visual and tactile expression.  Emphasis will be given to experimentation with ceramic material and process and concept development within given thematic structures.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course.  Enrollment limited to 8 students.  D. Pelletier

ART  220  DRAWING:  METHODS  Through a series of exercises and projects that use traditional drawing techniques, the student will learn the various methods artists use in developing and translating visual ideas into works of art.  These methodologies will provide the structure for the student to develop drawings based on their own concepts.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course and 205.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Staff

ART  221  PRINTMAKING:  EXPLORATION OF IMAGERY THROUGH PROCESS  The drawing process and imagery development through alternative, non-traditional materials (photocopy, alternate supports, transfers, stamping, etc.) used in conjunction with the traditional principles and methods of drawing.  Regular exposure to artists' processes and imagery since 1945.  This course fulfills the drawing requirement.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course and 205.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  T. McDowell

ART  222  SPECIAL TOPICS  This course provides an opportunity for students to create individual or collaborative studio projects in response to a central topic, process or theme.  Course content changes yearly, and may include field/site work, interdisciplinary, cross media, or community-based work.  May be repeated for credit.

              Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 10 students.  Staff

ART  224  ARTIST BOOKS  An examination of the form of the book as a place of inquiry.  Emphasis will be on experimental book forms, altering existing books, traditional and digital processes, and their relation to content.  Field trips and visiting artist workshops will be incorporated into the semester study.

               Prerequisite:  One 100-level and one 200-level art course, or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  A. Wollensak

ART  225  SCULPTURE WORKSHOP:  MOLD MAKING AND CASTING  This course introduces students to basic mold making and replicating originals by casting using a variety of materials.  This process offers unique formal and conceptual opportunities for sculpture.  Possibilities for exploration include plaster, rubber, and ceramic shell molds, for a wide range of castables including metal.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course.  Enrollment limited to 8 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  G. Bailey

ART  226  SCULPTURE WORKSHOP:  CONSTRUCTION AND INSTALLATION  Contemporary sculpture techniques such as welding, casting, assemblage, and kinetics, with an emphasis on the relation of material and process to concept.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100-level art course.  Enrollment limited to 8 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  G. Bailey

ART  241  ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 241.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.

ART  261  LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 261.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.

ART  299  (UNDER)COVER (OVER)SEEN:  VISIONING THE (IN)VISIBLE  This is the same course as Sophomore Research Seminar 299E.  Refer to the Sophomore Research Seminar listing in College Courses for a course description.

Level Three:  Concept and Media Development

Level three courses offer students further study or individual projects in specific or cross media.  Studio work is subject-based with a focus on content development and personal direction.  Students continue study in visual literacy, historical and contemporary perspectives, critical thinking, and problem solving.

ART  300  PHOTOGRAPHY II  Intermediate and advanced black and white techniques will be explored along with color image making through digital media.  Students will engage in the production of a thematically cohesive portfolio.

               Prerequisite:  Course 200.  Enrollment limited to 18 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  T. Hendrickson

ART  302  DESIGNING VISUAL INFORMATION  An introduction of visual representation methods, techniques, and principles that increase the understanding of complex data.  Students will develop hands-on skills in building and evaluating different visualization techniques and systems.  Focus will be on visual design concepts and formats for data comparison.  This is the same course as Arts and Technology 302.

               Prerequisite:  One 100-level art course and one 200-level art course.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  A. Wollensak

ART  303  THE SCIENCE OF ART:  RENDERING THROUGH OPTICS  An examination of the historical methods of artistic expression particularly those associated with defining the world around us through the use of optical devices and geometry.  The course will approach contemporary art-making (painting, drawing, printmaking, and photography) through the use of camera obscura, camera lucida, convex mirrors, lenses, and pinholes.  Camera-equipped phone, iPhone, or iPad required.

               Prerequisite:  Course 205 and 221.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Offered spring semester.  T. McDowell

ART  305  EXPERIMENTAL 3D  A critical, experimental approach to the study of three-dimensional graphics as a contemporary artistic medium.  Different approaches will be introduced to capture the physical world and to render work back into it, including modeling, motion-capture, animation, three-dimensional scanning of real-world objects and environments, and rapid prototyping.  This is the same course as Arts and Technology 305.

               Prerequisite:  Course 103 or 104, and another 200-level Art course, or permission of the instructorEnrollment limited to 10 students.  N. Assor

ART  306  LIVE+INTERACTIVE MEDIA COLLABORATIONS  An introduction to cross-disciplinary collaborations utilizing electronic and interactive media.  Students are invited to mix live performance, music and sound, sculptural and painterly work, video, 3D, text, and programming, all within the contexts of generating group media art projects with a "hacking" approach focused on speedy and creative solutions.  Use of graphical programming environments such as Isadora and Max/MSP/Jitter, VJ tools, networks, arduino boards, kinect sensors, and other devices. 

               Prerequisite:  Two courses in any of the creative arts or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  N. Assor

ART  307  SCULPTURE WORKSHOP:  BEYOND THE OBJECT  An introduction to concepts outside the traditional realm of three-dimensional form.  Students will have a wide range of freedom to choose their media within a given problem, methodology, or thematic construct.  Problem/process solving is encouraged as well as development of personal subject matter.

               Prerequisite:  Two art courses (at least one at the 200 level) and one art history course.  Enrollment limited to 8 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  Students may not receive credit for both Art 307 and 234.  G. Bailey

ART  308  TECHNE/TECHNOLOGY:  INVESTIGATIONS IN 3D  This course focuses on the connections between technology and the hand, as building methods and as critical ideas.  Projects expose students to both traditional and digital tools and materials, including computer aided design, and encourage experimentation with subject matter bridging the fields of art, craft, design, architecture, and technology.  This is the same course as Arts and Technology 308.

               Prerequisite:  One of the following:  Course 206, 208, 241, 217, 218, 219, 225, 226, 305, or 307; or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 8 students.  D. Pelletier

ART  309  DIMENSIONAL COLOR  An intermediate course that explores the temporal and spatial dimensions of color in architecture, visual art, and digital technologies.  We will examine perception with light and pigment and the use of color in 3D space and 3D virtual environments.

               Prerequisite:  One 100-level course in studio art or computer science.  Enrollment limited to 16 students.  Students may not receive credit for both Art 309 and 250.  P. Marks

ART  310  DESIGN:  PUBLIC PRACTICE  An in-depth exploration of methods and processes of public-based visual information design.  Student projects are designed and implemented in communities and public spaces.  Macintosh computer tools used with emphasis on appropriateness of form to context.

               Prerequisite:  Any 100 level art course and 207.  Enrollment limited to 12 students.  Offered alternating semesters.  A. Wollensak

ART  315  DRAWING III  An in-depth investigation of non-representational and representational drawing that further develops skills of observation, spatial analysis, and compositional organization.  Conceptual challenges are combined with exploration of varied media through traditional and experimental drawing activities.

               Prerequisite:  Course 205 and one other 200-level drawing or painting course,  or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 16 studentsOffered alternating semesters.  P. Marks

ART  316  CERAMIC SCULPTURE:  MOLDMAKING AND CASTING  Making molds from found objects or fabricated models, or replicating an original by casting is a process that offers unique formal and conceptual opportunities for three dimensional art.  Students will be encouraged to develop personal subject matter as they experiment with traditional and new technologies, plaster, clay, porcelain, and other materials.

               Prerequisite:  One of the following:  Course 102, 206, 208, 241, 217, 218, 225, 226, 305, or 307; or permission of the instructor.  Enrollment limited to 8 students.  D. Pelletier

ART  321  HISTORY, PLACE, MEANING IN SITE/ART INTERVENTIONS An interdisciplinary course introducing students to the process of creating site-specific works of art based on primary research relating to the history of a place.  The course will focus on sites in New London and southeastern Connecticut.  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 321.

               Prerequisite:  Two art courses (at least one at the 200 level) and one art history course.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  This is a designated Writing course.  A. Wollensak and A. Van Slyck

ART  335  INDIVIDUAL STUDIO INSTRUCTION I  Continuing studio instruction beyond Level Two courses.  (A) Assor; (B) Bailey; (C) Barnard; (D) Hendrickson; (E) Marks; (F) McDowell; (G) Pelletier; (H) Wollensak

               Prerequisite:  One course at Level Two with the corresponding instructor and permission of the instructor.  Offered both semesters.  Staff

ART  336  INDIVIDUAL STUDIO INSTRUCTION II  Advanced studio instruction for students who have completed Course 335.  Permission of the instructor.  (A) Assor; (B) Bailey; (C) Barnard; (D) Hendrickson; (E) Marks; (F) McDowell; (G) Pelletier; (H) Wollensak.

               Prerequisite:  Course 335 and permission of the instructor.  Offered both semesters.  Staff

ART  342  ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II:  SELECTED TOPICS  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 342.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.

ART  344  ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II:  "GREEN" ARCHITECTURE  This is the same course as Architectural Studies 344.  Refer to the Architectural Studies listing for a course description.

ART  349  SEMINAR FOR ART MAJORS  Discussions on topics relating to contemporary art and criticism.  Reviews of studio activity, visiting artists, and departmental critiques.

               Open to senior art majors.  Students are required to take this course during the fall semester of the senior year.  Staff

Level Four:  Concept Realization and Communications

Level four courses offer students advanced individual or interdisciplinary study with a focus on concept realization, self-reflective evaluation, critical thinking, and research.  Students pursue self-generated creative work with emphasis on content development and an awareness of the universality of art.

ART  449, 450  SENIOR STUDIO  Advanced studio instruction under the supervision of a specific instructor.  (A) Assor; (B) Bailey; (C) Barnard; (D) Hendrickson; (E) Marks; (F) McDowell; (G) Pelletier; (H) Wollensak.

              Prerequisite:  One course at Level Three.  Open to senior art majors.  Staff

ART  460  PERFORMANCE ART IN PRACTICE  This is a studio course based in the genre of Performance Art.  Students will explore the use of their bodies and sculptural elements to express content and personal artistic vision.  The course culminates in a public performance.  This is the same course as Dance 460.

               Open to juniors and seniors, and to others with permission of the instructors.  Enrollment limited to 15 students.  G. Bailey and H. Henderson

ART  497-498  HONORS STUDY